Book Giveaway & Interview: Josh Gagnier, Author of The Demon Within

Everyone, please welcome Josh Gagnier to the blog today! If you want to find out about the GIVEAWAY, then scroll to the bottom.

Connect with the author: Amazon ~ TwitterFacebook ~ GoodReads

If you could be an extra on a TV show or movie, what would it be and what would you be doing?

The Big Bang Theory!

As far as what I would do…The show How I Met Your Mother has a background scene that goes through a couple meeting, to having a child graduate college, to one of them dying. I think it was to hyperbolize how long the group was making Canada jokes over the years.

Having a scene like that behind a Sheldon Cooper monologue would be funny.

Myths and beliefs that we would consider fiction or fantasy in modern literature once upon a time shaped history (think of all the hunts for unicorns & dragons). Do you see modern fantasy fiction affecting human cultures today and how?

Absolutely.

One word answers are great, aren’t they 🙂

Seriously though, modern fantasy fiction is a multicultural, multiplatform community. When I was younger, “fantasy nerds/geeks” weren’t often popular and were perhaps a little outcast. Now cos-playing is an amazing adventure in which the people who don’t dress up are the new “outcasts”.

I think a major driving force with this shift would be those people are now game developers. The ones who played D&D and other d20 games on pencil/paper hours at a time are now creating video game versions of those same games.

Somewhere along the line, “nerd/geek” became a badge of honor. I think modern fiction and those writing it helped bring this change.

Many who are now driving forces in our entertainment were D&D players at one time (and/or currently) – Ranging from Vin Diesel and Dwayne the Rock Johnson to Kevin Smith and Felicia Day. Even as far to NBA’s Tim Duncan.

Fantasy fiction pulls on our imagination, and imagination has no limits.

What book should be made into a game (card, PC, board, etc.) and why? Is there a specific character who you would want to play in this game?

My answer is a little unfair as my favorite book series actually started as a D&D module – Dragonlance.

One of my favorite RPG video games is Wizardry 8. It has a 6 person party. I’ve played through several times with portions of the Dragonlance party as my in-game group.

I’m actually running a single character game with Fistandantalis – the most powerful wizard to have lived in the Dragonlance series. I used a game editor (Cosmic Forge) to make weapons from the books too.

Who are some of your favorite book villains?

My favorite villains would be one of two categories:
Those that redeem themselves before death – Darth Vader, Raistlin

Then there’s “villains” that aren’t really villains:
Jimbo from Summer of the Monkeys. To Jay, the 14-year-old protagonist, Jimbo is a formidable foe; from outsmarting his traps, to getting him drunk on whiskey. In the end, they were able to parley so to speak.

The Phantom Toll Booth – it’s a while since I’ve read it, but I remember two kings (one of words and one of numbers) who could not get along “because it was impossible” and they couldn’t agree on anything. Milo was able to “unite the clans” because:

“So each one of you agrees to disagree with whatever the other one agrees with, but if you both disagree with the same thing, aren’t you really in agreement?”

I actually used some of this type of perspective in my storyline. Sometimes what we see as good or evil isn’t as they appear; and more often than not things are a shade of grey rather than black or white.

Do you have any superstitions?

My superstitions are paradoxical in that they don’t exist if I believe in them and they do exist if I don’t believe in them.

For example – I won’t study within three days of an exam because I don’t want to unlearn the material. That’s nonsense, but I’ve psyched myself out on tests based on the “final reviews” that were within three days of the exam. I don’t suffer from test anxiety except for when I’ve studied within three days of the exam. Not to mention, if I don’t know it by then, it won’t stick with me anyway.

In writing your antagonists, do you want the reader to enjoy hating on him/her, or do you want the reader to be waiting for that magical moment when they redeem themselves?

The antagonist, Altha Galen, is more of a rumor and whisper for the majority of the book. The story leans toward boosting her reputation until the final battle when many perceptions are made clear while others are shattered.

The names of every character were chosen based on their meaning.

For example: Altha means “healer”; Galen means “tranquil” in Greek; it means “mad” in Swedish.

All parts of the character are held within their names.

A character we meet in chapter 1 is named Belath, named from Demonology Beleth (replaced the second ‘e’ with an ‘a’ or Alpha, aka ‘the beginning’). Beleth gives all the love of men and women. When appearing he looks very fierce to frighten the conjurer or to see if he is courageous. (The “alpha” makes sense after understanding the character’s purpose with the protagonist).

That said, I would recommend readers make absolutely no assumptions of protagonist vs antagonist. Remember, while we are the protagonist of our own story, we may be the antagonist in somebody else’s.

“The difference between religion and mythology is the audiences perspective.” Perspective, even an objective one, is still subjective.

If you could sit down and have dinner with 5 dead authors, who would you invite to the table? What would they order?

Not to be cliché but Shakespeare would definitely be one of them. I mean, he invented nearly 2000 words. Imagine writing and thinking “what word am I looking for here?” not finding one, then inventing one to suit your purpose.

Dale Carnegie – I would love to be able to drink from the tap of all that experience and research into how to influence people and public speaking.

Sun Tzu – I have friends who own their own companies that have said The Art of War helped them with business strategy. I finally bought it and have added it to the list.

Einstein because, considering his accolades, he preferred imagination over knowledge.

Ernest Vincent Wright gets an invite because he wrote Gadsby without a single ‘e’. I wrote a poem without the letter e and struggled every step of the way.

We’d be required to eat before arriving. It would be a night of imbibing, most likely Leadslingers Whiskey and Rum. Imagine the stories that could come from a night like that! (of course assuming the language barriers weren’t present).

What is a recurring or the most memorable geeky argument or debate you have taken part in?

Batman VS Iron Man

Who would win? Most I’ve talked to say “Bruce vs Tony” Bruce would win because he has extensive martial arts training but “Batman vs Iron Man” Iron man would win because he outguns Batman.

Then again, Batman was able to defeat Superman through planning and tactics – so Iron Man shouldn’t be a problem, right?

My argument is Tony Stark also trains martial arts and with the creation of the Bleeding Edge suit, he is never without one. Bleeding Edge is a suit made of nano-machines which are stored in his own body. Not only that, the suit connects to Tony on a neurological level – it’s no longer a suit, but an extension of his own body.

While they are both billionaires catalyzed into herodom – and it could be argued they are the same character with different window dressings – Iron Man would win vs Batman.
Unless it’s Batman from the series in which he has the Green Lantern ring. Giving Bruce Wayne a power based on intelligence, willpower, and imagination is a cheat code.
(Let the internet hate begin! J )

What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

Summer of the Monkeys, The Secret Garden, and Dragonlance Chronicles are the first books I read around 10 or 11 years old.

My copies of Summer of the Monkeys and The Secret Garden had very specific smells to them. So much so, that when I get other books with similar smells, I am reminded of those two stories. They are a major reason I understand why a lot of readers prefer hard-copy over digital copies.

Connect with the author: Amazon ~ TwitterFacebook ~ GoodReads

Synopsis of The Demon Within:

Joe grew up listening to the voice in his head. It helped him through school, helped him gain wealth in his career.

The final temptation of power was too much. He hadn’t considered the cost.

Now he must find a way to defeat The Demon Within.

Little does he know, his every move is being recorded. Every misstep is being judged by a Great Council. As he gets ever closer to winning over his demon, heavenly eyes watch from above. Some root for his success while others hope he’ll fail.

While Joe fights his demon on the battlefront, the angel Michael fights for his Soul in the court of the Great Council.

Will Joe win out?

Will Michael be able to save Joe’s soul?

 

Buy the Book:  Amazon

GIVEAWAY!!!

Win a signed copy of The Demon Within (US only) or an ebook version (international). There will be 2 of each, making 4 winners! Just click on the Rafflecopter link below to enter the giveaway or answer these questions in the comments: 1) Ebook or paperbook? What country do you live in? 2) What now dead author would you like to dine with? Giveaway ends April 8th, midnight, 2017.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: T. W. Fendley, Author of The Labyrinth of Time

FendleySolarLullabyFolks, please welcome the talented T. W. Fendley to the blog! I have enjoyed a few of her short stories (The Mentor & Solar Lullaby). Today we chat about favorite SFF book series, remote viewing, how the Iron Man would fare in an obstacle course, and plenty more! Also, don’t miss out on the most awesome audiobook giveaway (Audible.com & Audible.UK) at the bottom of this post!

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

If I can only chose one, I’ll pick Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series. The idea of psychohistory inspired me to learn about “real-world” cycles of all sorts, and to speculate on others. But I’d also love to read the Harry Dresden, Lord of the Rings, Sookie Stackhouse, Narnia, and Harry Potter series again for the first time—they were all so much fun, and in different ways, so I really can’t choose!

If you couldn’t be a writer, what would you choose to do?

When I was in college, I had a hard time deciding between pursuing a career in art or writing. Journalism won out, and years later, I switched to writing fiction. I still enjoy painting, especially with watercolors. I’d also love to get more involved in scientific research because I think the world is an incredibly fascinating place.

FendleyTheMentorIn this age of publishing, self-promotion is really necessary for the author. What do you enjoy most about advertising yourself and your works? What do you find most challenging?

I like meeting people from around the world—especially readers, but also other authors. My blog, The Writers’ Lens, has helped with that. The most challenging part of self-promotion is linking up with the “right” readers. I feel the ones who connect with my particular mix of history, science, and fantasy are kindred spirits.

What do you do when you are not writing?

One of my favorite past-times is remote viewing, a scientifically based protocol that allows intuitive processes to flow easily. As part of the Applied Precognition Project, I help make stock and sport predictions, and have a lot of fun. I also host a website on Associative Remote Viewing: www.ARV4fun.com.

Which favorite fictional worlds would you like to visit?

I’d love to fly to Neverland with Peter Pan, Wendy and Tinker Bell (avoiding Capt. Hook and the crocodile, of course). It would be wonderful to meet Aslan in Narnia, and to play quidditch at Hogwarts with Harry Potter. It goes without saying that I wouldn’t turn down a trip anywhere with the Doctor!

FendleyZeroTimeWhat is a recurring or the most memorable geeky argument or debate you have taken part in?

In the remote viewing community, we talk a lot about retro causality – how the present affects the past — and quantum entanglement.

You have to run an obstacle course. Who do you invite along (real or not, dead or not)? Will there be a tasty libation involved?

Since I’m not at all athletic, I’d ask Iron Man to “help” me run the course. Then we’d fly to Stark Tower, where I’d fix us each a frosty Bellini (white peach puree and prosecco) to celebrate.

FendleyTheMentorBook Blurb for The Mentor:

This quirky, futuristic romp into extreme consumer activism pits time-traveling sentient giraffes and lions against each other in a society where corporations have total control. Who says crime doesn’t pay?

FendleySolarLullabyBook Blurb for Solar Lullaby:

Dr. Flare Haich offers the only hope for diverting a solar flare that will dwarf the 2012 Mayan Event, which killed her parents and a half-billion others. She must overcome the betrayal of one she trusted and launch Empress III to keep the Sun’s fiery message from scorching the Earth as One Imix—the time of new beginnings—arrives.

FendleyJaguarHopeBook Blurb for Jaguar Hope:

Two black jaguars become the symbol of hope for a race facing extinction when they accompany a dying traveler back to her home planet. JAGUAR HOPE, a novelette, tells of the ill-fated journey to Earth’s Age of Crystal in this action-packed prequel to my historical fantasy novel, ZERO TIME.

FendleyTheMotherSerpent'sDaughterBook Blurb for The Mother Serpent’s Daughter:

Four-year-old White Heron begins her journey as a master shaman when she arrives in Teotihuacan with her sister Quilla and Mama Couen. Her fledgling skills prove the only defense against a priest of the Lord of Darkness in THE MOTHER SERPENT’S DAUGHTER, a short story prequel to the historical fantasy novel, ZERO TIME.

FendleyTheLabyrinthOfTimeBook Blurb for The Labyrinth of Time:

Spending spring break in Peru with her grandmother isn’t sixteen-year-old Jade’s idea of fun. She’d much rather be with her friends at Lake of the Ozarks. Then she meets Felix, a museum director’s son. Jade discovers only she and Felix can telepathically access messages left on engraved stones in the age of dinosaurs.

Following the ancient stones’ guidance, they enter the Labyrinth of Time and–with a shapeshifting dog’s help–seek a red crystal called the Firestone. But time is running out before the First Men return on the night of the second blue moon.

You can find T.W. online at:

Website

Blog

Twitter

Facebook

Goodreads

Audible

 GIVEAWAY!

T. W. has graciously offered up not one, not two, but three audiobook giveaways! You can enter all three if you like. All are open to Audible.com and Audible.UK folks.

Giveaway #1: Jaguar Hope & The Mother Serpent’s Daughter. Giveaway #2: The Mentor & Solar Lullaby. Giveaway #3: The Labyrinth of Time.

To enter, do the Rafflecopter thing below OR answer these questions in the comments: 1) Are you Audible.com or Audible.UK? 2) Which books are you interested in? 3) Please leave a contact email (I promise not to do anything questionable with it). 4) What fictional worlds would you like to visit? Giveaway ends September 15, 2015, midnight.

Giveaway #1: a Rafflecopter giveaway
Giveaway #2: a Rafflecopter giveaway

Giveaway #3: a Rafflecopter giveaway

Interview: T. Jackson King, Author of the Vigilante Series

T. Jackson King AuthorEveryone, please welcome T. Jackson King, an author I have had the pleasure of listening to at Bubonicon 45 (Albuquerque’s yearly scifi convention). Today we chat about some classics (The Odyssey, Kipling’s Kim, Dr. Jekyll, etc.), the dangers of unicorns, comics, and Wicca beliefs. Plus a whole lot more. So sit back and be entertained!

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

Star Trek the Original of course! I loved its first TV run. I spent the decade of the 60s following the US space program of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo, with the landing on the Moon, and was truly hoping that by –now-, 50 years later, we would have bases on the Moon and a full size colony on Mars with ships exploring Jupiter, Saturn and even distant Pluto. Which I still count as a planet! In books, I would love to re-read as “new” the KIM novel of Rudyard Kipling, which I first read in junior high school. It introduced me to the idea of a Land with multiple cultures, peoples and beliefs, a theme I have pursued in my Alien-dominated galactic adventure novels!

Given the opportunity, what fantastical beast of fiction would you like to encounter in the wild? Which would you avoid at all costs?

The ancient Viking beast Beowulf, who struck me as the essence of the Outsider, the Loner, the person Too Different to be tolerated by everyone else. Since I’ve felt like an outsider most of my life, yup, Beowulf would be fun to meet in the wild as we toasted rabbits over hot coals. As for avoiding a fantastic beast, well, I think it would be the Unicorn. Seems to me a horse with a pointed horn that long is meant to do one thing only—impale. I object to being impaled by something painful.

KingAnarchateVigilanteConventions, book signings, blogging, etc.: what are some of your favorite aspects of self-promotion and what are some of the least favorite parts of self-promotion?

Self-promotion is how we devoted writers meet New Readers and reward Loyal Readers. That includes in person book autographing, meeting folks at conventions, and chatting with them online on one of the Amazon threads that I spend too much time on! I most enjoy going to sci-fi conventions and doing book signings. I have yet to start a blog cause . . . it does not appeal. But I love the hunt for great artwork to use as cover art for my Indy published science fiction novels! Since I’ve read sci-fi since fourth grade, I love it and know what kind of artwork appeals to most SF readers. And there are fine pieces of original art with space themes that a writer/publisher can now license to use for cover art, at a very low cost. The cover art for my newest novel, ANARCHATE VIGILANTE, was done by a Spanish artist living in Madrid. I give his artwork credit on the copyright page.

As for least popular parts of self-promotion, it is the assumption by a few online people that folks who produce their own ebook novels for sale on Amazon are ‘not pros’ or are ‘all miserable amateurs’. Not me. I’ve been writing professionally for 26 years since 1988, when Warner Books issued my first novel RETREAD SHOP. I’ve been writing short stories and novels ever since. While there are plenty of amateur ebooks out there, as a reader I know that other readers will leave Reviews that alert browsing readers to an ebook’s deficiencies. And will compliment an author on a well done novel.

KingRetreadShopWhat book should be made into a game (card, PC, board, etc.) and why? Is there a specific character who you would want to play in this game?

Well, I would love to see a board game with that comic book magician guy Dr. Strange. I read lots of issues with him as the lead character and loved how he related magical and mystical stuff to the real world. His casting of spells was just great! Since then I’ve learned more about true ‘magical events’ by studying Wiccan beliefs. It is the Wiccan belief in Mother Earth having an internal ‘energy’ force that is the basis for the contemporary magic that I use in my post-apocalyptic novel THE GAEAN ENCHANTMENT. Gaean Earth Magic is a big deal in that novel. And I loved writing it.

KingGaeanEnchantmentWhich ancient or historical works have you not read and periodically kick yourself for not having made time for them yet?

Well, I have not read the ODYSSEY by Homer. Did read the ILLIAD. Both books are long shaman-like retellings of the adventures of gods, goddesses and mortals. Ancient Greek mythology, along with some Japanese, Chinese and Hindu mythology, have informed my use of such characters in some of my short stories and novels. My epic novel GALACTIC AVATAR is a mix of hard scifi with mythic archetypes that melds together Joseph Campbell-like gods and goddesses with the last 16 human survivors of Earth’s destruction as the humans realize they are also the “avatars” of those ancient gods and goddesses “in the flesh”. Had great fun writing that novel. Another ancient book that I have in my library, but not yet read, is the first Japanese novel by a courtesan lady of the imperial court. I gotta read it before the end of the year!

KingGalacticAvatarWith the modern popularity to ebooks, a book is no longer limited to a specific genre shelf. It is now quite easy to label place an ebook in multiple genres (i.e. YA, Fantasy, Horror). How do you see this affecting readers? Have you been inadvertently lured outside your reading comfort zone?

I think it allows readers to do what people always do—hunt around for stuff that rewards their effort in reading! And yes, while most of my novels are science fiction, I think several of them fit the Action Adventure and Spy Thriller categories, albeit set in the far future. As for my reading zones, they have indeed been expanded. I like reading about dragons in fantasy, like JD Hallowell’s novel DRAGON FATE. I also enjoy some horror, like a very short story I read recently titled “Feeding” by Elizabeth VanZwoll. She penned a very fine story that is under 1,000 words. But ancient history reading and sci-fi reading are my two primary zones of reading enjoyment!

Who are some of your favorite book villains?

Well, the Hyde side of the split personality Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is pretty awesome. He is a very very misunderstood villain. In my opinion! And Robert Louis Stevenson wrote a fine novella staring the two of them!

Who are your favorite hero duos from the pages?

Well, Superman in his various comic book incarnations has been a long favorite of mine. Read the original novel from the 1930s that gave rise to him and liked it. Batman and Robin are pretty decent superhero duos, tho most of their actions are well within the realm of normal physics.

CrispinKingAncestor'sWorldOften various historical aspects (people, locations, events) are used in fantasy and sometimes rehashed in a far-flung future. Are there examples of such historical aspects being used well in the SF/F genres? Examples of what didn’t work for you?

Well, yes, I myself have used ancient Egypt’s River Nile as the basis of a story in my novel ANCESTOR’S WORLD, while other writers past and present have done the same. I really like author Steve White’s use of ancient Mycenae and Crete, along with the real conflict between the Minoans and the Myceneans, in several Baen Books sci-fi adventures. As for poorly used examples, I would cite the use of Atlantis as culture and location in many “popular adventure” novels set in the present day, all of which paint a too simplistic picture of Bronze Age culture and humans. IMO.

If you could sit down and have tea (or a beer) with 5 fictional characters, who would you invite to the table?

Ah, a hard question! Well, I would invite Dr. Strange, Ironman, Odysseus himself, Beowulf the critter and Charon the Ancient who conveys dead people along the River Styx to their final abode in the Underworld. Bet Charon would have loads of neat stories to share! Course, I would have to have bowls for the weak Greek wine, pitchers of honey mead and high dose caffeine for other folks to enjoy as we spent a few hours outdoors under the spreading limbs of an ancient oak tree.

Care to share an awkward fangirl/fanboy moment, either one where someone was gushing over your work…..or one where you were gushing over another author’s work?

Have not had any fanperson moments yet. I guess my brief chat with Robert Silverberg 15 years ago at a SFWA members-only event during a con might qualify for me feeling geekish and gushing.

Finally, what upcoming events and works would you like to share with the readers?

I will be attending two science fiction conventions this year. They are Balticon 48 in Baltimore, Maryland, from May 23-26, and Bubonicon 46 from August 1-3 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Love to meet readers of all genres!

Places to Stalk T. Jackson King

Amazon

Website / Blog

Facebook

Goodreads

Twitter