The River by Bill Stokes

StokesTheRiverNarrator: Johnny Mack

Publisher: Stokes Creative LLC (2017)

Length: 19 minutes

Author’s Page

 

This is a tale of young man’s first deer hunt. The author starts us off with a personal note of how deer hunting has been a part of his life even if he no longer directly participates.

Set in Wisconsin in 1947, a teen boy on the cusp of manhood is invited on his first deer hunt. On the first night of the hunt, there’s stories and manly cooking at the hunting cabin as Uncle Duffy and his friends deal out the cards. Our hero soaks it all up. He desperately wants to be considered one of them. He feels a driving need to prove himself on this week-long deer hunt and he fears he won’t measure up.

First, I was a bit surprised that he was allowed to wander the woods alone on his first hunt as we typically make sure to go by twos on any kind of hike that is over an hour long. It’s a little unclear if the area was well known to our young hunter or not. Anyway, he navigates his way back to the cabin day after day.

There’s a rising urgency as the hunt progresses. The men shares stories of hunts past. I liked how the story built up and up. I could really feel the young man’s need to prove himself worthy. When finally the moment comes, there’s a big snag in his triumph, followed by a triumph of another kind. I was surprised by how things ended but was also well satisfied with it. Years later when this kid is a seasoned hunter, he will look back on this incident with wry humor.

I received a free copy of this book.

Narration: Johnny Mack continues to do justice to this author’s short stories. He does a good job of sounding like a young man and also of sounding like an older Uncle Duffy.

What I Liked: The snowy river setting; the excitement of deer hunting; youth wanting to prove itself worthy; how nature has a tendency to show us just how small we are.

What I Disliked: Nothing – it’s a fun hunting story.

Drink, Drank, Drunk by Bill Stokes

StokesDrinkDrankDrunkNarrator: Johnny Mack

Publisher: Stokes Creative LLC (2017)

Length: 1 hour 19 minutes

Author’s Page

Originally written nearly 40 years ago, this journalistic report of Wisconsin drinking and alcoholism still is relevant today. Bill Stokes strikes a sound balance between harsh facts and humanizing a variety of alcoholics.

From teens to the working man to the house wife to the lonely pastor to the well-liked young man – anyone can go from light drinker to an alcoholic. Stokes includes more examples, but you get the picture with the few I’ve mentioned here. In a few sentences, he paints a vivid picture of each, making it easy to picture people I know in real life in the same position. I like that this work points out that many kids learn from their parents about using alcohol appropriately, or not.

This non-fiction essay includes a brief discussions of AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) and other ‘cures’. He brings up questions about the cycle of ‘curing alcoholics’ only to have them back in the system a few months or years later. The author is frank with the reader and includes his own experience with drinking heavily and how he has changed his life and why.

While there are plenty statistics, they are no longer accurate today. However, they are still starkly frightening. It does make me wonder what the current statistics are with the higher population. This work is definitely dated with references to women entering the work force and “that’s why they need to relax like the working men.” I don’t know how accurate that is but I would like to see something backing it up… or not.

Stokes does point at the alcohol industry and their lobbying of Wisconsin laws concerning who can drink, advertising, etc. quite often throughout the piece. Again, I would like to see how accurate that is for today’s alcohol lobbying and the industry.

I originally read this as an ebook which, unfortunately, had several typos. I believe these typos were introduced when the Word or PDF version was translated into the Kindle version. For example, several times an ‘I’ will be an exclamation mark or such. Anyway, I found the audiobook version much more enjoyable because I don’t get hung up on the typos.

Narration: Johnny Mack did a decent job on this one. Sometimes he has an odd pause and sometimes he doesn’t pause as we move from one section or chapter to another. Other than that, he gave a good performance. He never sounded bored with the subject matter.

What I Liked: Fun cover art; a serious subject; even tho it’s decades old, it’s still relevant today; author humanized the issue; audiobook is better than the ebook.

What I Disliked: References to women are sometimes dated; some odd pauses, or lack of them, in the narration.

If the Fish Is a Trout: A Love Story by Bill Stokes

StokesIfTheFishIsATroutNarrator: Johnny Mack

Publisher: Stokes Creative LLC (2017)

Length: 13 minutes

Author’s Page

This is a sweet reminiscence of a man falling in love with a trout taking place in the Wolf River in Wisconsin.

I have never been fishing but this short tale has piqued my interest. I now want to fall in love with a river and her fish and the sport of claiming a meal with patience and perseverance.

Bill Stokes eloquently talks of cool misty mornings as well as steamy afternoons along a river as fish hunters claim their spots and do their best to entice a large trout to sink their mouths on their carefully crafted (or bought) hook-in-disguise. While I have always had some respect for fly fishing, since it requires skill and patience, I now see some beauty in it as well.

As always with Stokes’s works, there’s some humor tucked in here and there. I especially enjoyed his references to love affairs with the fish, his wife’s reactions to his addiction, and the light jabs to those weekend fishermen who drive right up to a chosen spot in the river instead of hiking along the bank a quarter mile or so.

I’ve listened to a few tales by Stokes at this point and I believe this is his most eloquent work. Obviously, he has a love of not only the sport of fishing but also a love and respect for the trout as well.

I received a free copy of this book.

Narration: Johnny Mack did well with this tale. He seemed to get caught up in the beauty of trout season and that came through in his narration.

What I Liked: Eloquent depiction of trout fishing; bits of humor here and there; respect for the fish; good narration.

What I Disliked: Nothing – now I want to try fishing!

The Great Fox Hunt by Bill Stokes

StokesTheGreatFoxHuntNarrator: Johnny Mack

Publisher: Stokes Creative LLC (2017)

Length: 15 minutes

Author’s Page

This simple tale of a weekly winter fox hunt evokes nostalgia for a simpler time. The author starts with a short note of his own real encounters with foxes over the years. While he participated in fox hunts as a kid, they were never successful in outsmarting their quarry. It’s clear from the beginning that the author has a deep respect for wildlife and took joy in his non-destructive encounters with foxes, even if it was a mere glimpse.

The tale itself is about a group of teenage boys meeting every Saturday in the winter to hunt a wily fox. They meet up in a warm kitchen where someone’s older female relative takes pity on them, making sure they are full of good cooking before they rush off into the snow and ice. At first, I was concerned that I wouldn’t like this story much because I don’t particularly approve of fox hunting. However, this is not your traditional English fox hunt with horns and horses. And I will tell you upfront that the fox wins out the day.

OK, so the tale itself gave me some good chuckles. The main character telling the tale is honest in that they don’t often see the fox and that there are many times where the fox seems to be leading them on a merry chase, enjoying the game.

When one of the kids does finally see the fox, he’s in no position to shoot at it. Instead, he simply has to admire the wit and regalness of the fox as it lopes off. I also liked the reference to their regular farm chores and how tired they are.

I received a free copy of this book.

Narration: Johnny Mack was a good pick for this short story. He has a fine voice for a tale about teenage boys. During the humorous parts, there’s just a hunt of laugh hiding in the narrator’s voice. 

What I Liked: Evokes nostalgia; the author’s opening note; the cover art; great narration; a fun tale of boys trying to be men; the wily fox.

What I Disliked: Nothing – a fun tale!

Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: Bill Stokes, Author of Hi-Ho Silver, Anyway

StokesShipTheKidsOnAheadFolks, please welcome back author and veteran Bill Stokes today. As some of you probably already know, Bill’s grandson, Paul Stokes, is running an Indiegogo Campaign to fund turning more of Bill’s books into audiobooks. Paul and Bill are offering up 1 Audible.com/Audible.UK copy of each of Bill’s published audiobooks in a giveaway. You can read more about the giveaway at the end of the post. Now, on to the interview!

Why trout fishing as opposed to other kinds of fishing?

Maybe it goes as deep as the DNA that is in all of us from the first creatures that crawled out of the water. There is something about standing waist-deep in a river and feeling the current around your legs while your brain tries to focus on capturing something out of that river that will satisfy your urge to be a predator. In that regard, as much as “catch-and-release” has become the anthem of sport fishing, I have never been comfortable with it. It seems to me like playing with death, like playing god in a way that was never intended. Also trout are damn good eating. As John Voelker—author of “Trout Madness” and “Anatomy of a Murder,” put it, a big draw is in the environs of trout—the act of putting yourself in wilderness settings away from all the trappings of modern life and alone with the flora and the fauna, exemplified by such simple beauty as a doe and her fawns easing out onto the sandbar up by the thick tamarack, or the scowling eagle that swoops down off the big dead birch and curses you with its piercing chirps. These are the good places in the world, and it is always worth the effort to go to them. Other kinds of fishing have their appeal but they are different and muted, depending way too much on such things as a 300 horsepower outboard.

Is there a genre or literary niche that you feel hasn’t gotten its deserved attention?

That would sure not be trout fishing: since way back in the days of Izaak Walton there has probably been more written about trout fishing than, well, not baseball, but certainly tennis or rock climbing. My book-shelves sag with volumes of attempts to improve trout fishing techniques, analyze casting styles, introduction of insects and the duplication thereof. That, of course, is a biggie, that “duplication,” otherwise known as fly tying. A corner of my “work” place looks as if a great and endless stampede of most of the creatures from Noah’s ark crashed into it years ago and not much has been done to neaten things up. And there is a continuous flow of “improved” ways to make a grasshopper or a mayfly, all of which puts a trout fisherman in front of his fly tying vise where for long moments—hours, he can remember and dream and get himself a little bit out there on the river even though he never leaves home.

Nothing really pops into my mind as a literature genre that has not received its due. I am constantly overwhelmed by the thousands of books, articles etc. that are produced. There has to be an awesome readership out there that eats up all the various products. Like every unfulfilled author before me, I am convinced that the system is rigged and biased and dumb because it has not seen fit to publish “Margaret’s War,” the great American novel that I have poured my heart into for so long. Some Day!

StokesAHauntingTaleThroughout your career as a journalist, you wrote some pieces on nature conservation. What other conservation activities have you taken part in?

As a journalist, and also, I guess, for personal reasons, I have not been much of a joiner and so other than supporting Trout Unlimited and donating to natural resource organizations there isn’t much there. I was briefly on the Ice Age Trail Foundation Board, and gave financial support to establishment of the Wolf Run Trail along the Black Earth Creek near Mazomanie. I greatly admire the volunteers who do so much in actual hands-on and material support to all kinds of conservation efforts. They speak to the deep respect within most of us for our natural surroundings, most of which are under constant threat by those among us who choose not to rein in greed.

It is time for you to host the book club: Who do you invite (living, dead, fictional, real) and what books will you be discussing?

I think I would just invite Mark Twain and we would talk about his books, and, as a writer, I would ask him about a few places where he wrote some stuff that was hard for me to accept—like Tom’s physical accomplishments on an occasion or two. And then I would listen to him tell me how much fun he must have had writing the wonderful stories that people so loved. How did he do that? We would talk about God, and we would laugh like hell about Him, not at Him, but about Him and how He has the world by the short hair and what that means in terms of civilized behavior.

Of course, I’d like to talk to Hemingway and ask him how better to comply with his advice when he said, “Don’t tell too much.”

Harper Lee should come to the meeting. And she should bring Scout and Atticus.

What decade from the last 100 years would you pick to have been a teenager in?

The one I was in—the 1940’s was pretty damn good. It was dominated by the insanity of war and god-awful things happened on a daily basis. The problem for me was being too young to qualify for any of the heroics, but since that later formed the basis for “Margaret’s War,” I can live with that. I think the second decade—1910 would have been interesting if for nothing more than to see the Model T Ford scare the bjesus out of the poor horses on the road at the time. That was a big transitional time, and in a way it was still going on into my generation: my dad had horses on the farm, but he also, of course, had a tractor, albeit one with steel wheels.

What books would you like to have with you on a desert island?

On my old library shelves are the Encyclopedia Britannica’s. I haven’t looked at any of them since the advent of the internet, but I cannot bring myself to throw them away. And since I will not have a computer in the desert island, I want the Britannicas. Would also like the Twain collection. And my dad used to read pulp westerns, I’d like a stack of those.

Some say journalistic and outdoor skills are becoming less important in our world of internet and factory farms. Have you had the opportunity to pass your skills on to others?

Everyone should know that in order to get a hamburger, you have to kill a cow, and somebody has to do it. I’ve preached that forever. I think my descendants learned that without my help, and some have adjusted their lives accordingly. I also see signs of interest and talent in creative stuff among the clan members, and that is very gratifying. Whether or not I had a hand in any of this is not important. I really hope all of them so inclined pursue these interests. It indicates a healthy curiosity about themselves and the life around them.

StokesToShootAMuskyWhat is the first book you remember reading on your own?

I cannot really say, but the first book I remember was “Black Beauty,” which my mother read to us around the old cook stove on winter evenings. I still have vivid images of that scene in my cluttered mind. Sometimes Mom would fall asleep while reading and we would have to wake her up.

Your previously published works have recently been and are being republished in several formats, including audiobook. Are you working on some new stories that you plan to publish?

All the things that Paul has done recently to revive some of my work has been the most exciting thing to happen in my life for years. I am most grateful. My writer’s ego always caused me to think perhaps some of the stuff deserved more than a one-day newspaper shelf life, or another look when books were involved by publishers who either went broke or sold out. Now Paul has made that a possibility. I have no idea what might happen, and I don’t know that Paul does. But, damn, we’re blowing the dust off a lot of things and I love it.

I have any number of projects I am working on, or have plans for: I would like to do something with my friendship with Bob Shephard, my Black Chicago friend who did so much to enrich my life and my family’s life. From the time I saw him on that snowy Korea hillside through the years with the Tribune, he was there as a most treasured companion.

I have a baseball story in the works, including such as Satchel Paige, Ted Williams, Bill Veeck, etc. This is partially written but needs time and attention.

Then, of course, there is “Margaret’s War” which is my baby, and which has been professionally edited (Jacquelyn Mitchard—Author of “Deep End of the Ocean” and to whom I paid $3600 to edit and advise). She was very laudatory about the writing and had promised marketing help but dropped me when I resisted making some changes she suggested and which I thought were not right. Have some very positive reviews from, among others, a UW emeritus professor of writing. I resist self-publishing and since I have only made feeble efforts toward the structured book world, nothing is happening. I want this novel to see the light of day while I can still see the light of day, and with Paul’s help maybe we can get that done.

There are some other things I want to write, and given the calendar, I had better get off my ass and get with the program. Paul will help with that, I know! He’s tough!

Author Bio

Bill Stokes, author of Ship the Kids on Ahead
Bill Stokes, author of Ship the Kids on Ahead

Born in Barron, Wisconsin, on September 11, 1931, Bill Stokes grew up on a small dairy farm between Barron and Rice Lake. He began his official writing career as an outdoor writer and general reporter for the Stevens Point Daily Journal, where he served as columnist, reporter and outdoor writer. In 1961 he moved to the Wisconsin State Journal, in Madison, where he wrote outdoor and personal columns, some of which were collected in a book “Ship The Kids On Ahead.” (added by Bill Stokes). In 1969, the Milwaukee Journal became his venue and as a feature writer and columnist, and he found new ground to cover in 1982 at the Chicago Tribune. After 11 years there, Bill retired to pursue free-lance projects.

During his long journalism career, Bill won many conservation awards, including the Ernie Pyle Memorial Award from Scripps-Howard News Service in 1972. His work has appeared in many national publications, among them Readers Digest, Outdoor Life and Sports Afield. He has compiled three anthologies of his newspaper writing and authored two children’s books.

Bill has lived on Madison’s west side since 1959, a home he shares with his wife, Betty. They have a 45-acre “back 40” on a trout stream near Westfield, where Bill engages in his hobbies of trout fishing, photography, bicycling and grandfathering. They have five grown children and 12 grandchildren. Bill and Betty also enjoy traveling.

Places to Connect with Bill Stokes

Website

GoodReads

Audible

Amazon

Indiegogo Campaign

Info on the 2 Audiobooks by Famous Outdoor Writer Bill Stokes Campaign

Wisconsin’s most famous outdoor writer, veteran and avid fisherman, Bill Stokes recently republished his 1968 collection of anecdotal short stories, Ship the Kids on Ahead, in print, eBook and audiobook. Now Bill wants to make more of his work available in digital audio format to reach an even greater audience. Audiobooks are expensive to create and backers like YOU can help offset the cost to bring these stories back to life and make his dream a reality.

“Hi-Ho Silver, Anyway” is estimated to be around 13 hours, “Trout Friends and Other Riff-raff” is estimated to be around 5 hours long. We are so excited to have successfully produced the first audiobook “Ship the Kids on Ahead” and we’re so excited to continue to bring my grandfather’s words to life but we need YOUR help! We have already brought a few of Bill’s short stories to the audio format, including “A Haunting Tale“, and “To Shoot a Musky“.

GIVEAWAY!

The Stokes are giving away 1 audiobook copy of each currently published work by Bill Stokes (Ship the Kids On Ahead, A Haunting Tale, and To Shoot A Musky) to 1 winner. The winner can choose Audible.com or Auible.UK. You can do the Rafflecopter thing below or answer these questions in the comments: 1) Do you have an Audible.com or Audible.UK account? 2) Have you ever been fishing? 3) Hop over to the Indiegogo campaign page and share the event on social media some place. Then post the link to where you shared it in the comments. Giveaway ends January 8, 2017 midnight my time.

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A Haunting Tale by Bill Stokes

StokesAHauntingTaleNarrator: Jeff Hays

Publisher: Paul Stokes (2016)

Length: 11 minutes

Author’s Page

The house has stood empty for some time. It’s fallen into a disreputable state. Some say it’s haunted. The rational say that’s not possible, that it’s only silly ghost stories. Our main character takes the dare. Will his mind be changed about ghosts?

This story was deliciously spooky. It is told in both a quaint and lyrical manner, being a straight-forward ghost story peppered with plenty of appropriately creepy imagery. Our main character isn’t convinced this old, rundown house is haunted. On a very cold, snowy night, he ends up stuck at the house with a sleeping bag.

Suspense builds as the character becomes aware of the oddities of the house, the strange sounds (or lack of the expected ones), and, eventually, something more. I really loved that this story didn’t rely of shock and gore; rather, the tale titillated with hints of something just beyond our accepted norm. Plus, there’s bats. Stories always get a bonus point if there’s bats.

In my opinion, this tale is fit for kids and adults alike. I can see reading it at a campfire during Scary Story time or having it available for kids at sleep overs. It’s a well-wrought story that I found very delightful.

Narration: Jeff Hays gave a wonderful performance, as always. His voice contained just a hint of creepy when describing the house. I also liked how he was able to contain a hint of skepticism at the beginning of the story, as the main character, and how that changed as the tale went on.

What I Liked: The suspense; the descriptions; skepticism turned into believe by a ghostly experience; great narration.

What I Disliked: Nothing – a great tale!

What Others Think:

Iron Canuck

Giveaway & Interview: Bill Stokes, Author of Ship the Kids on Ahead

Bill Stokes, author of Ship the Kids on Ahead
Bill Stokes, author of Ship the Kids on Ahead

Folks, please give a warm welcome to author and veteran Bill Stokes today. As some of you probably already know, Bill’s grandson, Paul Stokes, is running an Indiegogo Campaign to fund turning Bill’s collection of short stories, Ship the Kids on Ahead, into an audiobook. After reading about Bill on the campaign page, I thought he would be fun to interview and I wasn’t wrong! I’m also tossing in an audiobook from Audible.com giveaway to help promote the campaign. You can read more about the giveaway at the end of the post. Now, on to the interview!

You started your journalism career in a small Wisconsin town in the late 1960s and later in the 1980s moved to the Chicago Tribune. How did the experiences differ for you?

My progression from one newspaper to the next (four) was defined by ever increasing circulation size: Stevens Point, Madison, Milwaukee and Chicago.  At each one my freedom as a columnist and feature writer allowed me to practice a personal brand of journalism that people responded to. It was a great job, It worked, even at the Tribune, with Mike Royko on the staff.

LoganVukelichFeracaStokesWisconsinsRusticRoadsWhat now-dead author would you like to interview? What are some of the things you would chat about?

I would like to interview Mark Twain, of course.  We could talk of many things–human nature and all that goes with it. Hemingway would be fun to talk to.  He advised writers, “Don’t tell too much.”  I have a problem with that, but then I wasn’t doing fiction, and maybe that is why my novel, “Margaret’s War,” can’t find a publisher.

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

I would like to hear my mother read “Black Beauty” as she did when my brother and sister and I gathered around the old wood stove as children and imagined wondrous things.

StokesTroutFriendsIs there a historical moment during your life that you wish you had been able to cover as a journalist?

I once floated down the Mississippi River for three days on the Delta Queen with President Carter and Mrs. Carter and got to talk trout fishing with the president. I would liked to have gone fishing with him.

What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

I guess my worst job was as an infantry NCO in Korea when bullets were flying.  I was never shot at as a journalist, though some people up in Langlade County said never to come into any of their taverns after I wrote against a needless dam on the wonderful Wolf River.

Who are your non-writer influences?

Non writer influence was a man named John Lawton, a lawyer, conservationist and wonderful hunting and fishing companion who taught me how to think for myself and how to laugh at everything.

StokesTheRiverIsUsDuring your time as an outdoor writer, did you ever find yourself in dangerous situations?

Once I slept in a deer yard on the Red Cliff Reservation when the temperature dropped to thirty below and I could not buckle on my snowshoes the next morning to walk out over four feet of soft snow.  Covering the UW anti war demonstrations during the ’60’s involved getting tear gassed and clubbed by sheriff’s deputies a couple of times.  And then I know I drove sometimes when I was full of brandy, and that was probably the most dangerous part of the job.  Also really dumb!

What does your Writer’s Den look like? Neat and tidy or creative mess? Can you write anywhere or do you need to be holed up in your author cave?

My den is fairly neat, but then clutter doesn’t bother me, so maybe not.  As a journalist you learn to write all over under any circumstances–once in a barn full of cows bellowing so loud the re-write lady could not hear me on the barn phone, and finally said, “Stokes, where the hell are you?”

StokesShipTheKidsOnAheadWhat were you like as a kid? Did your kid-self see you being a writer?

I never thought seriously about writing as a kid, though I did a column for the High School newspaper.  My mother loved words and so there is that DNA.

What is the first audiobook you listened to? Are you an addict like other members of your family?

I have listened to a couple of books on tape while traveling years ago, and I really enjoy WPR Chapter A Day, but I have not listened to an audiobook.  I am looking forward to trying one, and hope maybe it will be like listening to Mom read “Black Beauty.”

Author Bio

Born in Barron, Wisconsin, on September 11, 1931, Bill Stokes grew up on a small dairy farm between Barron and Rice Lake. He began his official writing career as an outdoor writer and general reporter for the Stevens Point Daily Journal, where he served as columnist, reporter and outdoor writer. In 1961 he moved to the Wisconsin State Journal, in Madison, where he wrote outdoor and personal columns, some of which were collected in a book “Ship The Kids On Ahead.” (added by Bill Stokes). In 1969, the Milwaukee Journal became his venue and as a feature writer and columnist, and he found new ground to cover in 1982 at the Chicago Tribune. After 11 years there, Bill retired to pursue free-lance projects.

During his long journalism career, Bill won many conservation awards, including the Ernie Pyle Memorial Award from Scripps-Howard News Service in 1972. His work has appeared in many national publications, among them Readers Digest, Outdoor Life and Sports Afield. He has compiled three anthologies of his newspaper writing and authored two children’s books.

Bill has lived on Madison’s west side since 1959, a home he shares with his wife, Betty. They have a 45-acre “back 40” on a trout stream near Westfield, where Bill engages in his hobbies of trout fishing, photography, bicycling and grandfathering. They have five grown children and 12 grandchildren. Bill and Betty also enjoy traveling.

Places to Connect with Bill Stokes

GoodReads

Amazon

Indiegogo Campaign

Info on the Ship the Kids on Ahead Audiobook Campaign

“Ship the Kids on Ahead” is a collection of short stories originally written by Bill Stokes. They appeared in his column in the Wisconsin State Journal titled “Stokes Pokes”. “Ship the Kids on Ahead’ was originally self published in 1968 by Bill.

These stories show a small slice of his life during the 1950’s and 60’s starring Bill, Betty (his wife) and their children: Larry, Patty, Ricky, Scotty and Mike. Bill shares personal occurrences in his life through humor, wit and genuine love.

Bill Stokes self published Ship the Kids on Ahead in 1968, before all to tools, such as the internet and amazon were available. The sales of this book were not great at all. Paul, his grandson and the brains behind the Audio Book Reviewer site, wants to show to him that self publishing can be a viable option these days. On top of that he wants to make his work available to a new generation of readers and listeners that crave well written stories.

Bill Stokes has always given great advice. It is Paul’s goal to share his insight and advice to as many people as possible. How can he do this? Very simple, really. He plans to make his works available in modern digital formats for this generation and more to come!

Paul has assembled a great cast of narrators to help make this audiobook come alive: Stefan Rudnicki, Sean Runnette, RC Bray, Xe Sands, Joe Hempel, and James Foster.

StokesShipTheKidsOnAheadCampaign

GIVEAWAY!

I’m giving away 1 Audible.com audiobook; it can be any audiobook from the site you want. You can do the Rafflecopter thing below or answer these questions in the comments: 1) Do you have an Audible.com account? 2) Have you ever tried your hand at reporting on a news event? 3) Hop over to the Indiegogo campaign page and share the event on social media some place. Then post the link to where you shared it in the comments. Giveaway ends July 11, 2016 midnight my time.

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