Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: Christine Padovan, Narrator of Slade: Team Greywolf

Folks, please give a warm welcome to Christine Padovan. She kindly let me pick her brain with questions and is also offering up Audible.com/UK audiobook copies of Slade: Team Greywolf or Kyrathaba Rising (winner’s choice). Scroll to the end of the post to check out that giveaway!

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

Wow, can it be a fictional character instead? I know for sure I would want former CIA agent, John Reese from ‘Person of Interest’ to save me, because he seems to be able to get himself out from certain death anytime it faces him! Or his colleague, former Army Intelligence Support Activity operative, Sameen Shaw. Either one would do nicely 🙂

If you could, what book or movie or TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

The Forever War by American author Joe Haldeman, telling the contemplative story of soldiers fighting an interstellar war between humans and the Taurans. It’s a fascinating story, spanning years via time travel through space, and showing the social changes that occur to mankind on Earth and where it takes them over time. So well written and great humor too, I’d love to read it again someday.

Another amazing story that really grabbed and stayed with me since I was a kid is A Wrinkle in Time by American writer Madeleine L’Engle, first published in 1963. I loved that the main character was a girl like me 🙂 – just loved the whole story.

Note that both stories have happy endings. I’m a positive person and truly believe in good overcoming bad 🙂 and that goodness will always prevail 🙂

What makes you fall in love with a story?

Something about the storyline has to really connect with me in some way. If the idea behind the story doesn’t grab my attention – like with Eva Gordon’s writing with her paranormal suspense stories, where there is personal development between the characters as well as action and drama happening around them, then I’m probably going to stop reading the story.

The writings of Ayn Rand are examples of stories that make me think – a story that takes a hard look at social conventions and makes you think more about your own beliefs from your heritage and upbringing, and gives you a different perspective from someone else’s viewpoint.

Back in 2011, you were part of a Star Wars fan web series. What attracted you to this project? What were some of the highlights for you?

The attraction was I’m a sci-fi geek – I also did on-camera and voice work for ‘Dark Frontier’, an online web series for Triple-FictionProductions.net, a Star Trek fan series that films out of Florida. I was a lesbian Captain, Alexia Mandell killed off in the beginning of the pilot episode, but was also a Ferengi bar owner named Madam Mirak. I briefly played a Vulcan captain, Captain Searon on another webisode. Voice – was show announcer and did some ‘engineer emergency announcements’ over the intercom 🙂 Folks can check out the live streaming webisodes at http://triple-fictionproductions.net/DarkFrontier.html .

‘Rise of the Rebellion’, the Star Wars fan series was very fun. I was approached at the time in 2011 through Voice123.com by Can Akdag who is in Turkey, to provide the voice dubbing for the actress playing Flora Milon on webisode 4, ‘Jefi Business’ of the show.

Your readers can catch the webisode here: https://vimeo.com/channels/456071/21038731

I’m the show announcer saying ‘previously, on ‘Rise of the Rebellion’ and Flora’s one line around
the 2:15 timemark.

What was challenging is the actress said her line extremely fast and I had to watch the clip Can sent me
over and over, and I practiced timing the voicing of her line to fit her mouth movements. It was hard to do,
but it did work out with the takes I emailed back to Can.

The highlight was getting this as a credit to my IMDb profile. The only disappointment is Can did this out of his love for Star Wars and not to make money, so before he used my dubbing lines for webisode 5 – where I had a few more lines than just one – he actually didn’t dub webisode 5 and ended up going on to other projects that he could make a living at.

If you couldn’t be a voice actor, what would you chose to do?

I have a degree in Psychology and used to do some clinical social work and neuro-psychology research, but I would really enjoy being a police detective or an FBI agent. I’m fascinated with what makes people commit crimes such as murders, and I love the ability to look at all the details and put the puzzle pieces together, to solve the crime (like Sherlock Holmes). I’m very much a person who is into details, and when I watch television or meet people in real life, I look closely at them and can usually figure out if they are ill, or been ill, etc. or see through them with whatever quirks they possess. I really like understanding what makes people tick!

What were you like as a kid? Did your kid-self see you going into book narration?

Ha! I don’t think any voice actor out there ever thought they would be a book narrator or voice actor of any sort, unless they had a dream of being a radio dj or show personality :-). I was a tomboy as a kid – loved being a jumping bean since I could walk. Anything to do with being active and being outdoors, that was me!

If you could sit down and have tea (or a beer) with 5 fictional characters, who would you invite to the table?

Well, one would be Sherlock Holmes (either the modern day version like Jonny Lee Miller’s character on ‘Elementary’ or the Granada series with the late Jeremy Brett). However, Sherlock Holmes probably wouldn’t give me the time of day! I’d be too uninteresting to him and he would probably sit there, quietly analyzing everyone else. (Or he would see I’m too much like him and he wouldn’t want to waste time talking to me!)

The others would be Spock, Ben-Hur (played famously by the late Charlton Heston in 1959), Claire Randall from Diana Gabaldon’s ‘Outlander’ series, and 13 year old, Meg Murry from ‘A Wrinkle in Time’. Wouldn’t that be an interesting little tea/wine party 😉

What is the first book you remember reading out loud to someone else?

‘The Story of Babar: The Little Elephant’ by Jean de Brunhoff to a class of kindergarteners when I was in 4th grade 🙂

Guess my narrating to listeners did start at a young age, but I didn’t know then that it would be a real career now!

Thanks for asking me all these great questions – I’ve really enjoyed this interview 🙂

 

About Narrator Christine Padovan:

Christine Padovan is a popular narrator with a warm, distinctive voice, who can make non-fiction stories sound compelling and interesting, with versatility in bringing characters to life in the world of fiction. Specializing in Romance, Self Development, and Sci-fi/Fantasy genres. Audible Editor Review of David Poole’s bio/memoir of NASCAR’s Tim Richmond: “…Christine Padovan’s captivating, lively delivery perfectly encapsulates Richmond’s freewheeling spirit and the kinetic energy of Poole’s prose. Her skillful performance makes this experience as bracing and compelling as a NASCAR race, making it difficult to pause after pressing play.” Winner, 2013 Best Audiobook for BADWATER by Toni Dwiggins –Goodreads.com/eFestivalofWords.com

 

Places to Stalk Christine Padovan

website ~ AudioFilefacebook ~ twitter ~ Audible ~ linkedin

Book Blurb for Slade: Team Greywolf

Runt, Cricket, is an honorary beta of Team Greywolf, an elite special ops branch of the Lycan Intelligence Agency. As a member, she poses as a human and collects forensic evidence. Because of her low rank, she is assigned in the rehabilitation of Prince Slade suffering from morphogenesis after his entire pack is murdered, and then his indoctrination as a member of their team. Babysit a psycho, domineering alpha? Not on her watch. To complicate matters, she lusts for Slade. Foolish. A runt can never take an alpha as a mate.

Slade has two choices. Honor his murdered kin and serve Team Greywolf, or once healed, obey King Conan and return to his territory with an alpha mate. Complicating his decision is his relentless desire for the hot sexy little she-wolf, Cricket.

Early into his recovery, Slade and Cricket are sent to investigate missing werewolves. An unstable werewolf seems hardly a match for a former Nazi werewolf bent on bringing on Ragnarok, the destruction of mankind.

Can they stop this evil regime, while conforming to pack law that forbids any chance of them fulfilling their desire for each other?

Amazon ~ Audible

Book Blurb for Kyrathaba Rising:

One hundred and seventy years from now, aliens decimate Earth. A relative handful of humans survive, hidden in deep subterranean enclaves that offer some protection from surface radiation. Although the main attack is now seven years in the past, one alien ship remains in orbit, and the conquerors are not content merely to let humanity lick its wounds…

Amazon ~ Audible

GIVEAWAY!!!

Christine is graciously offering up 3 copies of Slade, winner’s choice of Audible.com or Audible UK. Also, if paranormal shifter romance isn’t quite your cup of tea or if you already own this audiobook, each winner can request an Audible.com/UK copy of Kyrathaba Rising instead. Do the Rafflecopter thing below or answer these questions in the comments: 1) Have you ever watched a fan-made movie or series? 2) Which are you interested in more – Slade or Kyrathaba Rising? Giveaway ends May 5th, 2017, midnight.

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Interview: Michael Meyerhofer, Author of Wytchfire

MichaelMeyerhoferAuthorEveryone, please welcome the author of Wytchfire to the blog today, Michael Meyehofer. We’re going to chat about poetry, ways to burn down a city under siege, the Star Wars Holiday Special, a college course in SFF literature, sidekicks, along with a lot more! Prepare to be entertained!

What are your non-writer influences?

Being an unapologetic addict to the History Channel (Ancient Aliens notwithstanding), I get a lot of inspiration from documentaries. I’m fascinated by ancient and religious history, and of course ancient military history, and I try to weave those elements into my stories whenever I can. One small example: in The Knight of the Crane, the forthcoming sequel to Wytchfire, I needed a quick way for one of my more loathsome antagonist-generals to take down a well-fortified city. I recalled a documentary that mentioned how someone (I think it was Olga of Kiev) conquered a hostile town by capturing birds, tying burning twigs to their claws, and setting them free to spread the blaze around the rooftops of the town. I thought it was a fascinating, if macabre, story (those poor birds!) and decided to incorporate something similar into my book. I also tried to incorporate a lot of my nerdy interest in the history of the samurai and medieval European knighthood.

MeyerhoferWytchfireWhich ancient or historical works have you not read and periodically kick yourself for not having made time for them yet?

Ha, I’ve always wanted to sit down and read Paradise Lost but to this day, I still haven’t gotten around to it. I’m really fascinated by different religious texts (especially the Epic of Gilgamesh). Not sure if this counts because I technically read them piecemeal in college, but I’ve always wanted to go back and spend some time with The Odyssey and The Iliad, too.

Who are some of your favorite book villains?

Not to state the obvious but pretty much all of George R. R. Martin’s villains are chillingly awesome—I think because they’re so complex, never quite completely evil. In that same vein, I’m also really partial to Tolkien’s Boromir, Lloyd Alexander’s Ellidyr, and Raistlin from the Dragonlance books.

Often various historical aspects (people, locations, events) are used in fantasy and sometimes rehashed in a far-flung future. Are there examples of such historical aspects being used well in the SF/F genre? Examples of what didn’t work for you?

Not to sound like a broken record but GRRM is another great go-to for this. His rugged, realistic depictions of realistic, messy warfare seem heavily influenced by medieval history and political intrigue. I think Katherine Kurtz’s Deryni books pull that off, too. Here are a couple more examples relating to warfare, since we’re already on that topic. As I mentioned earlier, I’m also a big fan of how Raymond Feist handles his battles (and even more so, the preparation for battle). There’s also the obvious example of how JRR Tolkien’s experiences with trench warfare affected his depictions of battle in his Lord of the Rings books, not to mention how Kurt Vonnegut’s experiences informed Slaughterhouse-Five and his other works.

There are plenty of examples of historical stuff woven into stories besides those involving warfare, though. I was recently impressed by the way Deborah Harkness uses her background as an academic to weave historical elements into A Discovery of Witches. I also love the echoes of “western” philosophy and “eastern” religion that frequently pop up in SFF, plus how the social and political strife in SFF worlds often mirror the social and cultural revolutions we’ve experienced throughout our country’s own relatively short history. Frank Herbert’s Dune books and Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series are a couple examples. In terms of what doesn’t work for me, though, I don’t have specific examples so much as a general complaint. I find that I’m not all that interested in stories that propagate rather silly historical misconceptions. For instance, the Knighthood in my Dragonkin Trilogy is heavily inspired by the samurai, but I tried to steer clear of silly stereotypes that the samurai were always honorable, undefeatable paragons of virtue. I think that, like medieval European knights, they could be as terrible and repressive as they could be honorable and selfless.

MeyerhoferClayShaper'sHusbandWhat reboots (or retellings) of classics have you enjoyed? Are there ones that haven’t worked for you?

I’m a sucker for pretty much any dark re-imagining of fairy tales, ever since Anne Sexton did that in her poetry. I picked up My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me the other day and I’m already halfway through it, really digging the premise! Also maybe it’s just the English prof in me but I can’t help thinking that virtually all the stories we see today can in some way be traced back to Shakespeare (of which there have been plenty of excellent and awful adaptations, by the way). That’s not a bad thing, though, since probably all the basic story elements in Shakespeare’s plays can be traced back even earlier, maybe to Homer. And his stories echo even earlier myths, back and back, to cave-shadowed campfires near heaps of charred animal bones. Even back then, I think humans had the same basic fears, desires, and curiosities (but significantly less literacy and way more body hair).

In this age of publishing, self-promotion is really necessary for the author. What do you enjoy most about advertising yourself and your works? What do you find most challenging?

There’s no denying the fact that self-promotion is as challenging as it is essential—especially with so many other fine, hard-working authors clamoring to get noticed! You need to write countless blog and forum posts, plus maintain very active Facebook and Twitter accounts, and maybe even more importantly, you can’t just promote your own work! Especially with so many books coming out all the time, readers don’t just want to hear from someone who pops in once a year to announce a book release, then disappears. They want authors who are also active members of the community. And it has to be genuine because readers are smart and they’ll see through insincerity pretty quickly. In other words, an author also has to prove that they’re a voracious reader, that he or she loves the genre they’re writing in, that they’re as willing and eager to talk shop and promote other writers they admire. Oh, and authors need to do all this while still finding time to write and revise three, four, even five-hundred-page manuscripts.

That’s all pretty daunting, sure, but I don’t mind. Actually, I like it because it’s worthwhile. Whoever said that it should be easy? I’d add that I first came to publishing as a contemporary poet, and poetry has an even smaller audience than SFF! So that made me more respectful of what it takes to “make it,” and even more grateful and humbled when I find a reader willing to give my work a chance, or a fellow author willing to promote my work aside her or his own.

What is your favorite fictional holiday (from books, movies, or tv)?

I’d love to sit in a big smoky hall and hoist a mug on Durin’s Day (the Tolkien Dwarfish equivalent of New Years Day). Whacking Day from The Simpsons would be cool, provided the snakes are unquestionably eeeevil! I’m also tempted to add Life Day from the Star Wars Holiday Special, though I’m not quite sure I can bring myself to do it.

MeyerhoferDamnatioMemoriaeWhat were you like as a kid? Did your kid-self see you being a writer?

Oh, I was the poster child for shyness and over-sensitivity! I recall spending whole days sitting with a book—sometimes because I was lost in a story, other times because I was afraid to go outside and face bullying for birth defects (a malformed right ear and a bad limp, which seemed like the end of the world back then). Eventually, though, overcoming this gave me extra ambition and some extra perspective that I could weave into my own writing.

If you could sit down and have dinner with 5 dead authors, who would you invite to the table? What would they order?

Li Po – hot and sour soup and a salmon bagel. Walt Whitman – a big plate of hot wings. D. H. Lawrence – mead and a turkey leg. Emily Dickinson – a Cinnabon. Raymond Carver – straight whiskey, probably.

If you were asked to create the syllabus for a college class in SFF literature, what books would be on there as required reading? As passing discussion?

Oh, that’s a tough one! I know there’s some disagreement as to whether or not this constitutes SF but Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five would be high on my list. I already mentioned George R. R. Martin earlier, though I’d probably start with The Tales of Dunk and Egg, his Song of Ice and Fire prequels. I’m also partial to the character development (particularly for Erik Von Darkmoor) and the realism in Shadow of a Dark Queen, the first book in Raymond Feist’s Serpentwar Saga. Of course, there’s Arthur Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (though I’m maybe a bit more partial to Childhood’s End). I’d also need Madeleine L’Engle, J.K. Rowling, and Philip Dick in there somewhere, too, though I’d have a terrible time picking one of their books over another.

KnaakReaversBloodSeaCare to share an awkward fangirl/fanboy moment, either one where someone was gushing over your work…..or one where you were gushing over another author’s work?

What, me be awkward?! Ha, actually, I’d have a hard time coming up with an instance when I met a writer (novelist or poet) that I really admired and I wasn’t kind of a dork about it! I tend to get really, really excited when I read something I like. In fact, I have kind of a strange rule that if I come across a book that blows me away (or a short story or a poem, for that matter), I make an effort to contact the author and let them know. I’ve been lucky enough to have a few readers do that for me and let me tell you, that kind of thing makes it all worthwhile.

Cover art can be so important for a book, making or breaking sales. What cover art has caught your eye, that you found stood above other books?

While part of me has a soft spot for minimalism, I also love the epic feel of pretty much every cover made for Richard Knaak’s books. And I’m still jealous of the cover of Raising Chaos by fellow Red Adept author, Elizabeth Corrigan!

CorriganRaisingChaosWhat do you do when you are not writing?

I’m really into exercise, especially weightlifting. Like I said, I love documentaries. And video games. And, of course, reading.

Side characters can make or break a story. What side characters have you enjoyed in other works (books, movies, plays, etc.)?

Oh, I have a soft spot for side characters! I absolutely love Tolkien’s Faramir, Lloyd Alexander’s Prince Rhun, GRRM’s Davos Seaworth, Terry Brooks’ Garet Jax, and Margaret Weiss and Tricky Hickman’s Hugh the Hand.

You are also a poet, and as such, what works would you recommend for a science fiction, fantasy reader?

I like poets who know how to tell engaging stories with humor and cool imagery, but without pretension. Luckily, there are plenty who can do just that! Here are just a few of my contemporary favorites: Dorianne Laux, Sharon Olds, Yusef Komunyakaa, Stephen Dobyns, Allison Joseph, Justin Hamm, Norman Minnick, Peter Davis, George Bilgere, Djelloul Marbrook, Travis Mossotti, and Tony Hoagland. For poets technically no longer listed among the living, some of my favorites are Walt Whitman, James Wright, Li Po, Emily Dickinson, D.H. Lawrence, Basho, Issa, Chiyo-ni, Wallace Stevens, and Ai.

Places to Find Michael Meyerhofer

Website

Blog

Facebook

Twitter

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K2DPJ60

Barnes & Noble:  http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/wytchfire-michael-meyerhofer/1119392198?ean=2940149291106

Kobo: http://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/wytchfire-3

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20935130-wytchfire

Book Page on RAP: http://redadeptpublishing.com/wytchfire/

Author page on RAP:  http://redadeptpublishing.com/michael-meyerhofer/

Giveaway!

Click the link below to take you to the Rafflecopter giveaway. You could win some great Red Adept Publishing Swag!

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Interview: Kat Howard, author of Breaking the Frame

ApexBlogTourBannerEveryone, please welcome Kat Howard to the blog today! She has graciously given us her time as part of the awesome Apex Blog Tour that Andrea from The Little Red Reviewer put together. We have so many great authors and bloggers participating in this blog tour, with reviews, interviews, guest posts, and giveaways. make sure to check out the tour schedule and stop in at the other posts for SFF goodness! I’ve included the cover art of various publications Kat Howard’s short fiction has showed up in. For more, check out her Goodreads page.

Reality in my fiction: how important is it? Lengthy travel, cussing, and bathroom breaks happen in real life. How do you address these mundane occurrences in your writings?

HowardBreakingTheFrame
http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/breaking-the-frame/

Here’s the thing – I think if something serves the story, then it belongs there. If it doesn’t, leave it out. So, am I going to take the reader to the bathroom every time a character has to pee? Probably not. But, if a character has food poisoning from the romantic dinner her potential love interest has just made for her, I might well go into detail, because the way that the characters react to that situation could matter to what happens to their relationship.

Curse words, extremes of language and situation, work the same way. If it serves the story, if it’s organic to the situation, or to the voice of the character, then yes, I use them in my writing.

GaimanStoriesAllNewTalesWhat nonfiction works have you found useful in building fictional worlds, cultures, and plots?

I try to read a lot of nonfiction, because the world is a strange and wonderful place, and I like to know things about it. I think reading widely is one of the best things a writer can do. I love biographies and memoirs, and I think Patti Smith’s Just Kids is one of the best things I’ve ever read. I’m a huge fan of Peter Ackroyd’s histories, and I love Marina Warner’s critical writing. I also love Caroline Walker Bynum’s work. Some other favorites in the nonfiction realm include On Monsters by Stephen T. Asma, The Book of Barely Imagined Beings by Caspar Henderson, and How Music Works by David Byrne.

ApexVolume4Often various historical aspects (people, locations, events) are used in fantasy and sometimes rehashed in a far-flung future. Are there examples of such historical aspects being used well in the SF/F genre? Examples of what didn’t work for you?

Well, I’m a medievalist by training. I have a Ph.D. in English Literature, and I also focused on religion and history in my time period (1350-1650). This time period, and setting, tends to be a very popular one for SFF writers to use, and I read books that are using that era pretty critically, because I’m familiar with it. I have great respect for writers like Guy Gavriel Kay, who clearly do their research, and then use that research as a way to strengthen their stories.

Unfortunately, many people don’t do research, or do so in an incomplete fashion, or use what they think an era was like – “oh, women had no power back then” or “there weren’t any people of color in Europe then” – both flawed assumptions, by the way, as ways to not include things like diversity in their fiction. Which, look – even if the history did back up those assumptions, we’re writing SFF. We can alter the history. Please do not tell me that it is easier to imagine a wizard than a woman.

KlimaGlitterAndMayhemIn this age of publishing, self-promotion is really necessary for the author. What do you enjoy most about advertising yourself and your works? What do you find most challenging?

I really like being able to speak directly with readers, whether that’s via something like twitter, or meeting in person. Being able to connect with people is a delight. The challenging aspect is figuring out how to balance getting the information out so that people can find it, without overwhelming them with noise.

AdamsCohenOzReimaginedEmeraldCityAs a young reader, unspoiled by the realities of this world, what stories and authors drove you to delusions of grandeur, expecting to be swept up into a magical tale or a laser battle?

I don’t think any writers drove me to delusions of grandeur, but some of my favorites as a young reader included Madeleine L’Engle, Susan Cooper, and Lloyd Alexander.

SuterraneanMagazineSummer2013As a published author, what non-writing/reading activities would you recommend to aspiring authors?

I’m not quite sure how to answer this, because really, if you want to be a writer, then you need to read a lot, and write a lot, and those are the best activities that you can be doing to further your writing. Beyond that, do what interests you. Find things that fire your curiosity, that you can become passionate about, and do those.

ApexVolume3Writing in the fantasy genre, how do you take the standard tropes and turn them sideways? Or even upside down?

I think the first thing you have to do is know the tropes, and know how they’re being used in the field. Sometimes they can be useful in their conventional, right-side-up fashion. But if I decide that I’m going to write something to purposefully subvert a trope, it’s usually because something about the way that trope is currently being deployed gets under my skin – makes me angry, annoys me, and so I’ll write to explore my feelings about that.

NightmareMagazineFeb2014Finally, what upcoming events and works would you like to share with the readers?

I have a short story, “Dreaming Like a Ghost” coming out in Nightmare in February, and “A Different Fate” in Lightspeed in March. I also have a novella, The End of the Sentence, which I cowrote with Maria Dahvana Headley, coming out in August from Subterranean Press.

Places to Stalk Kat

Strange Ink

Twitter: @KatWithSword

Goodreads