A Wizard by R. F. Whittaker

Narrator: Jake Urry

Publisher: Richard Whittaker (2016)

Length: 5 hours 38 minutes

Author’s Page 

Ambrose is in a self-imposed exile after he accidentally killed a man with his magic. Now this wizard roams the wilderness looking for a purpose and possibly for redemption. He comes across Bertold who has a bloodsucker imprisoned. He’s waiting for the sun to rise and roast her alive. Ambrose won’t stand for this and his actions change the course of his life, bringing unexpected companions into his life along with deadly danger.

This tale had some high points, some amusing moments, and a lot of info dumps. Sometimes I was totally engaged and sometimes I was bored. the villains are really easy to spot being brutish, so that took some of the suspense out of the book.

Florentina is the bloodsucker (vampire) that Ambrose rescued at the beginning of the tale. She’s got some dimension to her. She’s suffering from an illness that means she needs fresh blood. Ambrose vows to find a cure for her but his wizard skills are still in their fledgling state. He bumbles his way through the book. Florentina offers some wisdom and acts like a central spoke around which all the other characters rotate.

Each time we got a new character in this tale, there would be a big info dump that would mostly be their back story. It was a rather tedious way to get introduced to each character. It often took me away from the plot. From Florentina to Reggie to the Wolfboy to even Bertold. It was like reading a character development sheet instead of being an integrated part of the story.

Florentina and Ambrose fall in love almost instantly. It’s not even lust. It’s this deep soul-cleaving love. Since it was so automatic I had trouble getting behind it.

The Tookingtons were amusing. They were these little animated flowers that acted as an honor guard for Florentina. Definitely dangerous in great numbers.

By the end, Ambrose and his crew still have some things to wrap up. I smell a sequel in the making. I was very satisfied to see that Ambrose had found his tribe. He’s the stronger for it.

The Narration: Jake Urry is so good in every book I have listened to him narrate and his performance here doesn’t disappoint. He gives Florentina an accent. The Wolfboy gets his own unique voice. The ladies sound like actual women. Ambrose’s emotions are nicely displayed in this narration.

What I Liked: The cover art; the initial set up; Ambrose’s quest; all these misfits that are brought together; ending left room for a sequel; great narration.

What I Disliked: Insta-love didn’t work for me; lots of info dumps.

Audible Giveaway & Review: Darkside Blues by Ambrose Ibsen

Scroll to the bottom for the giveaway!

Narrator: Jake Urry

Publisher: Ambrose Ibsen (2017)

Length: 5 hours 43 minutes

Series: Book 3 The Ulrich Files

Author’s Page

Note: Even though this is Book 3 in the series, it works fine as a stand alone novel.

Following upon his success with the Exeter House mystery, Harlan Ulrich’s private investigation business has been doing quite well. He’s got a decent apartment, an admirable collection of fancy coffees, and a cat. Now he’s been hired to find yet another missing person. However, there’s more than one twist with this one. The missing person isn’t really missing but she’s not alive either.

I do believe this is my favorite of this series so far. Harlan Ulrich is truly becoming a ghost talker. He’s got his paranormal experiences of the past two books to draw on, so with this one he starts off on firmer ground, knowing some of the rules of engagement right from the start.

And we have Sparkles! Well, he was renamed by Harlan. His new name is Beardsley though I don’t think the cat really cares what Harlan calls him as long as there is food in his dish. Beardsley has a thing for coffee too and that mainly involves batting the beans about the apartment once he’s torn a hole in the bag.

Michael Poole has hired Harlan to approach his estranged daughter, Vivian. He says he’s seen her three times in an old neighborhood they used to live in when she was a teenager. However, he can’t bring himself to approach her and needs an intermediary. He’s chosen Harlan to be that man. However, Harlan discovers right away that Vivian died 10 years ago. As he continues to dig into the case, he finds other things that don’t match what Michael told him. Someone is lying. It becomes a tangled web as Harlan tracks down the ex-wife (Laguerre) and speaks with the stepmother (Meredith).

Let’s not forget the apparition that appears to be the teen-aged Vivian. However, she’s walking about with a limp. In life, she was wheelchair bound. Harlan has to unravel the truth about her apparent suicide. As Harlan makes more attempts to communicate with her, she responds in turn. However, her attempts of communication are rather disturbing to both Harlan and Beardsley.

One of the things I really enjoyed about this book was getting to know more about Harlan. He’s a teetotaler and his father was an alcoholic. This tale provides more glimpses into his past and that also provides a starting place for Vivian to communicate with him.

I really wasn’t sure where the author was going to take me with this one. I liked that I couldn’t guess major plot points right away. The story’s ending hung on a tipping point right up to the end. Will this character go this way or that, will it end in justice or vengeance, will Harlan have nightmares for months or sleep like a man after a fulfilling day’s work? I found the ending to be satisfying and I expect Harlan can live with the horrors he’s seen knowing he helped where he could.

I received a free copy of this book via The Audiobook Worm.

The Narration: Jake Urry continues to be great as Harlan Ulrich. His British accent continues to diminish with each book as he smooths out his American accent. Harlan sounds like a proper gent who happens to live in Toledo, Ohio. I liked his spooky voice for Vivian, who has a messed up face. Urry also added in a few sound effects here and there that worked quite well. I especially enjoyed the wind sounds in the background of some of the final scenes of the book.

What I Liked: Great narration; Beardsley the cat and his treatment of coffee beans; Harlan’s getting quite good at ghost talking; we learn about Ulrich’s past a bit; unraveling all the lies; very good ending.

What I Disliked: Nothing – I really enjoyed this one.

Check out more reviews on the blog tour.

About Author Ambrose Ibsen:

Once upon a time, a young Ambrose Ibsen discovered a collection of ghost stories on his father’s bookshelf. He was never the same again.

Apart from horror fiction, he enjoys good coffee, brewed strong.

Ambrose Ibsen has penned numerous horror and thriller titles, including The Ulrich Files, Transmission, The Demon-Hearted Series and the Winthrop House Series.

Website ~ GoodReads ~ Twitter

Synopsis of Darkside Blues:

“Ghosts don’t simply latch onto places, investigator. People can become haunted, too.”

A missing person. A city plunged into unforgiving winter. A dangerous spirit.

Though enjoying an increase in business following his last case, life isn’t all roses for private investigator Harlan Ulrich. His newest job, another missing person’s case, is unlike any other he’s ever taken on.

Local businessman Michael Poole hires Ulrich to find his estranged daughter.

The problem?

She’s been dead for a decade.

Join Ulrich on a trip into the darkness, into the frostbitten underworld, as he seeks out a hateful phantom with only a cat and a thermos of good coffee on his side.

Darkside Blues is the third novel in the Ulrich Files series by Ambrose Ibsen.

Audible ~ Amazon

Audio Excerpt

About Narrator Jake Urry:

Jake Urry has been narrating and producing Audiobooks since February 2016, and in that time has released 17 titles, including The Cryptic Lines by Richard Storry, White is the Coldest Colour by John Nicholl, and the PI Harlan Ulrich series by Ambrose Ibsen. His narration work is often dark and suspenseful, and he developing a reputation for Mysteries, Thrillers and Horrors. In 2017 Jake will be working on more work by John Nicholl and Richard Storry, along with a sprinkling of Fantasy adventures.

Website ~ Facebook ~ Twitter

GIVEAWAY!!!

Win a 3 month subscription to Audible (US or UK)! Ends June 15th.

Darkside Blues

Medicine for the Dead by Ambrose Ibsen

Narrator: Jake Urry

Publisher: Ambrose Ibsen (2016)

Length: 5 hours 32 minutes

Series: Book 2 The Ulrich Files

Author’s Page

Note: Even though this is Book 2 in the series, it works fine as a stand alone novel.

Harlan Ulrich is a private investigator whose coffee addiction has led him into financial embarrassment. He’s about to be homeless, but a homeless man with an excellent coffee maker. Some friends of his insisted on inviting him to the bar even though he doesn’t drink. There he meets an old acquaintance who offers him a place to stay provided he looks after the building, which is being renovated. Of course, Harlan can’t turn this down.

The Exeter House has quite the history but the bar downstairs and the soon to be open apartments on the upper floors promise it another life. Vagrants living in the building has been a problem in the past and now Harlan has to walk the building at odd hours of the night to ensure no one is messing about. Of course, something spooky happens followed by more spooky things happening.

The covers for this series make it look like there will be a gorefest but really, there isn’t. There are a few scenes that depict some horror, but the author uses these wisely and they drive home the torture these spirits are in as unfinished business from their life remains to be seen to. Lucky for them, Harlan can see and hear them. Unlucky for Harlan as this keeps him from sleeping.

I loved the cat Sparkles! He added some amusement and suspense to the story in good measure. I look forward to seeing him in future stories. I think the added responsibility is good for Harlan too. Hopefully he will manage his coffee addiction wisely in the future so that he and Sparkles maintain a roof over their heads.

This tale does have two weaknesses and those are that it has a small cast of characters and there’s only 1 female. There’s Harlan, Sparkles, Harlan’s 2 friends from the bar, the old acquaintance that has him building sitting, and the barman working the bar downstairs. Pretty soon this turns into a missing persons case and there’s only so many players I can squint at suspiciously. Early on it was apparent who was most likely involved. With that said, I was surprised by the number of dead, and so was Harlan. Obviously, I would like a better gender balance but that’s not always possible with a small cast.

Once again, Harlan has helped a flailing spirit set things right. For a few moments there, it looked like things could go very badly for Harlan, but since I know there’s a 3rd book in the series, I wasn’t too worried. This was a very satisfying story, despite being able to pick out the culprit early on. I love how Harlan has to argue with himself, convincing himself of what he’s seen and heard, and then using his detective mind to dig into it a bit deeper. In the first book, he stumbled into the paranormal. In this tale, he’s got the experience to build on and I feel he’s really becoming that paranormal investigator the dead so desperately need.

I received a free copy of this book via The Audiobook Worm.

The Narration: Jake Urry really brings something to these books. Yes, he does have a British accent for some of the words, but I can totally believe Harlan Ulrich is simply a very proper speaking gent that happens to live in Toledo, Ohio. He does great with the other voices as well, keeping each distinct. Harlan goes through a variety of emotions in this book and Urry brought them all to life.

What I Liked: Spooky but not a gorefest; great use of suspense; Sparkles the cat; quality coffee leads our hero into ruin; satisfying end; great narration.

What I Disliked: Small cast of characters so it was easy to pick out the evil-doer; only 1 female character.

What Others Think:

Sci Fi & Scary

My Trending Stories

The Sick House by Ambrose Ibsen

Narrator: Jake Urry

Publisher: Ambrose Ibsen (2016)

Length: 6 hours 48 minutes

Series: Book 1 The Ulrich Files

Author’s Page

Harlan Ulrich is a private investigator and he’s just about out of coffee. He needs a case that will pay well enough to make rent and replenish his kitchen. Dr. Klein has gone missing and his friend has already checked all the usual possibilities. He needs a professional to investigate. So Ulrich is off to the small town of Moonville, Dr. Klein’s last known location.

This was a dark piece of fiction that kept me entertained. It wasn’t a gore fest, which I was concerned about due to the cover art. There was some descriptive scary bits here and there but it wasn’t gratuitous. Ulrich is an interesting character. With a name like Harlan Ulrich, how could he not be? He has this coffee fetish that keeps coming up throughout the story. The quality of the coffee really affects his mood and I can understand that. I say better no coffee than bad coffee.

Set in mostly in Moonville, Ohio, the folks are small-town minded. They like to keep their town secrets and while curious about outsiders, they aren’t jumping to open up about the past. Ulrich has to do some digging to learn about the Sick House, which was an infirmary run by nuns and was shut down some decades ago. Dr. Klein once worked there and Ulrich makes a visit to the run down place. What he finds gives him the creeps and he’s hesitant to return a second time.

Mysterious notes follow and he finds a person who once worked there that can shed some light on the past. Here is the one weak spot in the plot. Once a certain character is brought up, it really becomes clear what happened so the rest of the book is just watching Ulrich piece it together and find evidence. It was still an entertaining read. I really didn’t know if Ulrich would fall prey to some supernatural entity and have to make a run for it (there’s at least 3 books in the series, so I know he lives) or perhaps burn the place down. So that was exciting to see how the author would wrap things up in a way that leaves Ulrich and his travel coffee mug free to do PI stuff another day.

The ending was a satisfying one. Old wrongs are acknowledged and some things are set to rights. The mystery of the missing Dr. Klein is neatly wrapped up. I look forward to Book 2!

I received a free copy of this book via The Audiobook Worm.

The Narration: Jake Urry has a mesmerizing voice. I really do like it but here I have to give him a B for final product even as I give him an A for effort. He has an English accent that he does a pretty good job of tucking away for this Ohio based story. Yet sometimes there are certain words that get a very distinct English accent. Still, even with this, I really liked his voice for Ulrich. He has a rich deep voice that can gripe about bad coffee or show fear in the face of some paranormal unknown. Urry also did a great job with keeping his character voices distinct and his female voices were pretty good.

What I Liked: Mysterious, a little creepy, but not a gore fest; the small town setting; nuns; abandoned infirmary; a dark history for the Sick House; Ulrich’s coffee fetish; Urry’s narration even with the English accent.

What I Disliked: At a certain point in the story, the rest of the plot became very clear. It was still entertaining to watch Ulrich figure it out. There were certain words that had a distinct English accent for the narration, which was at odds with the Ohio setting.

What Others Think:

The Page Turner

Mia Celeste

The Haunted Reading Room

Interview: Jake Urry, Narrator of Shadows of Tomorrow

MeatsShadowsOfTomorrowEveryone, please welcome Jake Urry to the blog today. I really enjoyed his narration of The Cryptic Lines by Richard Storry. Today, we’re here to promote his latest narration, Shadows of Tomorrow by Jessica Meats. A big thank you to Jess at The Audio Book Worm for setting up this book tour. Swing by the tour page to catch more interviews, spotlights, and audio excerpts. On to the interview!

Is there a genre or literary niche that you feel hasn’t gotten it’s deserved amount of attention?

I think that although the genre is very popular with a lot of people, Sci-Fi and Fantasy novels can often be disregarded as ‘all being the same’ by many readers who haven’t tried them, and won’t because they think they’ll be reading about wizards and aliens that they can’t relate to. I think if more people tried an occasional new Sci-Fi or Fantasy novel they’d be surprised at the diversity of the stories and the legions of complex and relatable characters!

What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to voice acting?

I spent a short time (that felt like a lifetime) in a factory assembling cosmetic displays, which involved the same mindless repetitive tasks day in and day out. One of my final jobs there was gluing tiny rubber feet on to thousands of Hello Kitty nail varnish holders. I was very happy to say ‘Bye Bye Kitty’ when the time came. Voice acting in complete contrast is different every day, challenging, more fun and most importantly lets me use my imagination!

What reboots (or retellings) of classics have you enjoyed? Are there ones that haven’t worked for you?

The 1975 animation of Jules Verne’s The Mysterious Island is something that terrified and enthralled me as a child and has stayed with me ever since. There have been a lot of live action versions but I think the animation is the best. I’m also partial to Nick Park’s claymation classic Chicken Run, as a re-imagining of The Great Escape. I don’t mind admitting I think it’s a glorious piece of cinema.

If everyone came with warning labels, what would yours say?

‘If sleeping, wake me up at your own peril’

If you could sit down and have tea (or a beer) with 5 fictional characters, who would you invite to the table?

Miss Mowcher from David Copperfield
Gandalf from LotR
Dumbledore from Harry Potter
Winston Smith from 1984
Captain Ahab from Moby Dick

What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. (I tend to do things in the wrong order).

Finally, what upcoming events and works would you like to share with the readers?

I’ll be taking part in Mystery and Thriller Week in February (12th-22nd), it’s shaping up to be awesome with a lot of authors and contributors involved! Check it out here – https://mysterythrillerweek.com

Thank you for having me over on your lovely blog!

JakeUrryNarratorAbout Jake Urry:

Jake Urry is a British actor and audiobook narrator, and also co-founder of Just Some Theatre. Since graduating from an Acting degree course in 2012 he’s toured with Just Some Theatre as an actor and producer, worked on a number of commercial voice over projects and most recently started producing Audiobooks. Jake has produced over 10 titles since March 2016 and has rapidly found himself at home narrating Thriller, Horror, Mystery and Suspense titles. His audiobook work includes dark psychological thrillers White is the Coldest Colour and Portraits of the Dead by John Nicholl, occult mystery series The Ulrich Files by Ambrose Ibsen, and gritty Sci-Fi novel Shadows of Tomorrow by Jessica Meats.

Connect with the narrator: Website ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ GoodReads ~ Voices ~ Soundcloud

MeatsShadowsOfTomorrowSynopsis of Shadows of Tomorrow:

Earth is at war. Portals are opening across the planet and bringing creatures known as Outsiders. Their only desire is to eat, leaving a trail of destruction in their path. The only people who can stop them are the Defenders – led by Gareth Walker – who can open portals of their own to target the Outsiders in minutes. Gareth’s only advantage is an ability to see glimpses of his future.

For the past decade the Defenders have held back the incursion, but now a new portal opens, bringing something that Gareth did not see coming. As he must find a way to stop this new threat, he starts a quest for answers. He must learn how the war began and find a way to stop them once and for all.

All the while, he is aware of a shadow in his future; a moment he can’t see past. Will stopping the Outsiders cost him everything?

Audible ~ Amazon ~ iTunes

JessicaMeatsAuthorAbout the Author Jessica Meats:

Jessica Meats is a graduate of the University of York and works in the IT industry. She draws on her experiences as a technology specialist and martial arts student to create a unique and interesting fictional community of combat experts and computer geeks.

Website ~ Twitter ~ FacebookGoodReads ~ tumblr

Interview: Richard Storry, Author of The Cryptic Lines

StorryTheCrypticLinesEveryone, please welcome Richard Storry to the blog today. I really enjoyed his suspenseful book, The Cryptic Lines, which is perfect for this season! A big thank you to Jess at The Audio Book Worm for setting up this book tour. Swing by the tour page to catch more interview, reviews, and guest posts.

What makes you fall in love with a story?

A story needs to grab me during its first page or, at least, its first chapter. The kind of subjects which appeal to me are things which are mysterious, with explicit or implied suspense.

What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

For a number of years I was working five evenings a week as a cocktail pianist in hotels and restaurants. It helped to pay the bills, but it was a thankless task. Writing is much more satisfying and rewarding.

Who or what are your non-writer influences?

It would have to be the combination of certain teachers of years gone by (both academic and musical) together with the music of certain composers, such as Bernstein, Copland, Gershwin, Richard Rogers and Andrew Lloyd Webber.

If you could own a famous or historical art work, what would it be? Would you put it on public display or keep it privately?

Any painting by John Constable. All his works are amazing and capture the essence of their images perfectly – though I would probably keep mine for private viewing only!

StorryTheCrypticLinesGraphicIs there a book to movie/TV adaptation that you found excellent? How about book to stage adaptations?

Although it’s an old one, “Gone with the Wind” made the transition from book to movie brilliantly. Regarding book to stage…forgive me if I appear a little self-obsessed, but I was delighted with the adaptation for the stage of my novel “The Cryptic Lines” which was done by Pete Gallagher. He made a very fine job of it!

If you could sit down and have dinner with 5 dead authors, who would you invite to the table? What would they order?

Charles Dickens (Christmas turkey), Agatha Christie (Anything fine dining), Victor Hugo (Escargots), Robert Burns (Haggis), Shakespeare (Roast pheasant).

Side characters can make or break a story. What side characters have you enjoyed in other works? What side characters in your own work have caught more attention than you expected?

I’ve always loved the assistants – Dr. Watson, Captain Hastings etc. In my latest book, “A Looming of Vultures” (being published soon) a side character called Lukas was introduced just to provide some companionship to one of the main characters – but he ended up having a pivotal role to play as the story neared its conclusion.

What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

‘A’ is for apple, ‘B’ is for ball(!)

 

RichardStorryAuthorAbout Richard Storry:

Richard is the author of four published novels, with his fifth “A Looming of Vultures” due for publication in 2017. Prior to writing his first novel, “The Cryptic Lines” he was very busy in the theatrical world: He composed the incidental music to Chekhov’s Three Sisters, seen in London’s West End, starring Kristin Scott Thomas and Eric Sykes, and subsequently broadcast on BBC4 television. His musical adaptation of “The Brothers Lionheart” premiered at London’s Pleasance Theatre, followed by a successful run at the Edinburgh Festival where it was voted Best Childrens’ Play. “The Cryptic Lines” has now been adapted for both the stage and screen.

Connect with the author: Website ~ Twitter ~Facebook ~ GoodReads

Synopsis of The Cryptic Lines:

StorryTheCrypticLinesSet in a sprawling gothic mansion in a remote coastal location, somewhere in the British Isles, the elderly recluse Lord Alfred Willoughby is deciding what is to become of his vast fortune after his death. Whilst his head is telling him to leave nothing at all to his wastrel son, Matthew, his heart is speaking differently. After much deliberation, in a last-ditch attempt to try and show to his son the importance of applying himself to a task and staying with it to the end, he devises a series of enigmatic puzzles cunningly concealed within the lines of a poem – the cryptic lines. If he completes the task successfully and solves the puzzles he will inherit the entire estate; but if he fails he will receive nothing. However, from Lord Alfred’s Will it emerges that Matthew is not the only interested party. The mysterious old house holds many secrets, and nothing is as it first appears…

Audible        Amazon

About the Narrator Jake Urry:

JakeUrryNarratorJake Urry is a British actor and audiobook narrator, and also co-founder of Just Some Theatre. Since graduating from an Acting degree course in 2012 he’s toured with Just Some Theatre as an actor and producer, worked on a number of commercial voice over projects and most recently started producing Audiobooks. Jake has produced over 10 titles since March 2016 and has rapidly found himself at home narrating Thriller, Horror, Mystery and Suspense titles. His audiobook work includes dark psychological thrillers White is the Coldest Colour and Portraits of the Dead by John Nicholl, occult mystery series The Ulrich Files by Ambrose Ibsen, and gritty Sci-Fi novel Shadows of Tomorrowby Jessica Meats.

Website ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ GoodReads ~ Voices ~ Soundcloud

The Cryptic Lines by Richard Storry

StorryTheCrypticLinesNarrator: Jake Urry

Publisher: Richard Alan Storry (2016)

Length: 4 hours 13 minutes

Author’s Page

Lord Alfred Willoughby has finally passed away. His solicitor, Charles, must see to his will, which holds quite the surprise! Once Willoughby’s adopted son Matthew views the will, then the race is on for cryptic poems to be deciphered, more clues discovered, and hopefully the final fortune to be won before the time limit is up. Set in a Gothic mansion somewhere in the British Isles, this tale holds much suspense and a little bit of trickery.

This was a delicious suspenseful book, perfect for the Halloween season. The story opens with a rainy storm and the death of rich, old Lord Willoughby. James, the butler, helps Charles to find Willoughby’s important papers. Eventually, Charles finds a film, which is actually Willoughby’s recorded will. After viewing it, they track down Matthew, Willoughby’s wayward son. From there, the story turns into a treasure quest. Poems contain clues and those clues lead them all over the sprawling estate. This tale is complete with hidden passage ways, an actual crypt, and nearly forgotten family secrets.

While the 4 main characters are all male, there are two more characters, Mrs. Gilkerry (housekeeper/cook) and Meg (retired maid) who are more than they seem. First, I really enjoyed Mrs. Gilkerry’s cooking. The descriptions of her meals made my mouth water. Who says English cooking lacks flavor and zest? Meg doesn’t come into the story until much later so I won’t reveal too much about her. However, I will say that the discussions with her provided some humor in the middle of this tense book.

This treasure hunt reveals much about the natures of not only Charles and Matthew, but also Lord Willoughby. In a way, Charles learns more about his client’s private life through this quest than he ever would through his legal duties. Matthew has a long history of being a bit of a scoundrel, only returning home when he gets into more trouble or debt than he can manage. This hunt provides a background to show his true mettle: misunderstood man who made some mistakes or a man who truly lacks a moral compass? The ending has more than one secret to reveal! The winding suspense was excellent and I quite enjoyed taking an afternoon to read this. My only wish is that I had enjoyed it on a dark and stormy night.

I received this audiobook at no cost via The Audio Book Worm.

The Narration: Jake Urry was a really good choice of narration for this book. I loved his proper English accents along with his range of voices for all the characters. I especially loved his voice for Meg. Here and there, the characters reveal some emotion and Urry portrayed those emotions quite well. 

What I Liked: The Gothic mansion setting; Lord Willlougby’s clues and poems; James’s never-ending politeness; Meg’s less than sharp wit; Mrs. Gilkerry’s meals; the suspense of the hunt; the final reveals; excellent narration. 

What I Disliked: Nothing – this is a delicious, suspenseful tale!

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