Bookish Giveaway & Interview: James W. George, Author of My Father’s Kingdom

Scroll to the bottom for the giveaway!

Folks, please give a warm welcome to historical fiction author James W. George. I recently had the pleasure of listening to his book, My Father’s Kingdom, which explores the relations between the Wampanoag tribe and the Puritan colonists of the 1670s.

If you could be an extra on a TV show or movie, what would it be and what would you be doing?

Wow, what a fun question. Is time travel a possibility? I might have to go back to 1970 and pilot a B-25 while sitting next to Art Garfunkel in “Catch-22.” If I have to stick around 2017, I guess “The Tudors” is long gone so I can’t gallivant around with Jonathan Rhys-Meyers, Natalie Dormer and Henry Cavill in my finest sixteenth-century frippery.
I guess I’ll keep it simple and appear on the next “Avengers” movie. Maybe I can smack some of the smugness out of Tony Stark, and my daughter would be extremely jealous.

What are the top 3 historical time periods and locations you would like to visit?

My first answer is very predictable. When writing and marketing My Father’s Kingdom, I’ve held fast and true to a fundamental precept: King Philip’s War in 1675 New England was one of the most fascinating and catastrophic events in American history, and most of us have never even heard of it.

So certainly, I would welcome the opportunity to see seventeenth century New England, especially the first interactions between some of the Native people and the European settlers.

I would love to visit well-studied periods like WWII, the American Revolution, the Viking conquests of England, and Tudor England, but I feel like historical fiction and cinema have done such a remarkable job of recreating these eras, I almost wonder if anything would genuinely be surprising.

If you’re going to hand me a fully-functioning time machine, I think I’d like to see some really obscure and mysterious periods, such as the empires of South America.

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?

Brom Bones from the Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Sleepy Hollow is a remarkable piece of American literature. I love it so much my daughter is named Katrina. The lyrical prose by Washington Irving is simply unbelievable.

Brom Bones is the villain, but what did he actually do? He deceived the interloping schoolmaster, Ichabod Crane, with a brilliant ruse. No one was actually hurt, maimed, or killed. I guess in the end he already has his happy ending, but I would hope he and Katrina lived a wonderful married life together.

It’s time for you to host the book club. Who do you invite (living, dead, fictional, real)? And what 3 books will you be discussing?

Wow. Let’s go with some intellectual giants of American history. Maybe Increase Mather, John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Let’s throw in some modern-day wit. Perhaps Mark Steyn can regale us with the conservative viewpoint, and Jon Stewart can hold down the left wing.

What to read? Probably 1984 and Catch-22, but we’re going to have to do an awful lot of explaining to all those old people. And of course, my book, so Increase Mather can tell me how unfairly I portrayed him.

What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

I used to load trucks for UPS while in high school. It was physically exhausting and quite difficult. You don’t load one truck at once, you loaded multiple trucks.

In addition to the physical toil, it was all like one big game of Tetris; you have to make sure you’re building the wall of boxes in the most logical, sturdy fashion possible. I guess there’s a lesson there for writers; sometimes you think all the disparate elements are seamlessly coming together in a nice, impressive structure, but when they don’t, you have to tear it down and start over.

What nonfiction works have you found useful in building fictional worlds, cultures, and plots?

As a writer of historical fiction, I rely on countless works of nonfiction that help make 1670s New England come to life. I think one book in particular, which is probably my favorite work of nonfiction, is Don’t Know Much about the Bible by Kenneth Davis. He approaches all the complex, thorny questions of the Bible with an open mind, and gears the book toward those who know little or nothing about the Bible. It helped me imagine how incomprehensible the Puritans and Bible must have been to Native Americans in the seventeenth century.

What do you do when you are not writing?

I live my relatively mundane life here in southeastern Virginia. I work my day job (which I love) and spend time with my wife and two kids. I’m a big music fan and it’s been a great pleasure watching my sixteen-year-old guitarist son completely eclipse me musically.

What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

Yikes. No distinct memory is coming to mind. It might have been Clifford the Big Red Dog. I also remember loving the “Encyclopedia Brown” series as a kid. We have a house full of books and have kept quite a few children’s books. My favorite, hands-down, is Yertle the Turtle. That is Dr. Seuss at his finest!

Which ancient or historical works have you not read and periodically kick yourself for not having made time for them yet?

I’ve completely immersed myself in the New England of the 1670s this year, but it’s reminded me how ignorant I am of so much history regarding the European exploration of the United States before the Mayflower. I live down the road from Jamestown, so I’m pretty familiar with that, but the tales of Spanish conquistadors like Coronado and DeSoto exploring the southern U.S. in the 1500s are unbelievable. How many Americans know the tale of the French Huguenot settlement in Florida?

Finally, what upcoming events and works would you like to share with the readers?

Book Two should be out this fall, and I’m delighted with how it’s shaping up. I think Book One is quite atmospheric. It develops the characters and sets the tone for King Philip’s War, whereas Book Two is the actual war and is a little more action-packed. Benjamin Church, one of colonial America’s most famous soldiers, will play a very prominent role.

Check out more interviews, spotlights, & reviews on the blog tour.

About Author James W. George:

James W. George is a debut author currently residing in Virginia.  He is a graduate of Boston University, a military veteran, and a lover of historical fiction.

Amazon ~ GoodReads

Synopsis of My Father’s Kingdom:

In 1620, more than 100 devout men and women crossed the treacherous Atlantic Ocean and established a colony in the New World where they could build a righteous and Godly society. Without the fortuitous friendship of the Wampanoag people and their charismatic leader Massasoit, however, it is doubtful the holy experiment would have survived.

Fifty years later Plymouth Colony has not only survived, it has prospered, and more and more Englishmen are immigrating to New England. The blessed alliance with the Wampanoag, however, is in severe jeopardy. Massasoit has passed away along with most of the original settlers of Plymouth Colony, and their children and grandchildren have very different ideas about their historic friendship.

Thrust into the center of events is Reverend Israel Brewster, an idealistic young minister with a famous grandfather and a tragic past. Meanwhile, Massasoit’s son, known as “King Philip” by the English, is tormented by both the present and the past. He is watching the resources and culture of the Wampanoag nation fade away at the hands of the English and desperately wishes to restore hope and security to his people.

In a world of religious fervor, devastating sickness, and incessant greed, can the alliance of their forefathers survive? Or will New England feel the wrath of tragic, bloody war?

Audible ~ Amazon ~ Audio Excerpt

About Narrator Angus Freathy:

Angus Freathy was born and educated in London – that’s the one in England, for you Ohio folks!

After qualifying as a Chartered Accountant, he went to Switzerland to join Nestlé for a 2-year wandering assignment, which lasted 37 years and involved travel and work on every continent (except the cold ones at the top and bottom).

Periods of residence in the U.S., Hong Kong and Switzerland have resulted in a network of friends and acquaintances with an amazing range of world insight and a wide repertoire of mostly excellent jokes.

Since retirement, Angus and his (still working) wife, Debra have lived in Oregon, Maryland and are now in Dublin, Ohio, ‘the only place we have actually chosen to live since we have been married!’.

Following a crushing rejection by the BBC at the age of 19, Angus is re-activating a long-held ambition and launching a new career in voice-over, with the sole intention of having some fun and being in touch with some very talented people.

Website

GIVEAWAY!!!

The giveaway is for a $25 Amazon gift Card. Open internationally! Ends August 6th, 2017.

My Father’s Kingdom Giveaway: $25 Amazon Gift Card

Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: JB Rockwell, Science Fiction Author

Folks, please give a warm welcome to J B Rockwell to the blog today. Learn about Jennifer’s dream library, just who the Swiss Army knives of spec fic are, and how she ended up in a duel of toothpicks at dawn! Interested in winning a CD copy of her latest SF book Dark & Stars? Then scroll to the bottom for the giveaway!

If you could be an extra on a TV show or movie, what would it be and what would you be doing?

Well, if you could resurrect Firefly, I’d be all over that. Me and Kaylee hanging out, slinging wrenches in the engine room, lobbing one-liners at the rest of the crew. 🙂 If we’re sticking with something current, I’d love to be on Fargo—that is the darkest, funniest, most oddball show out there and I love it. I’d want to play a Deputy or something so I can PACK HEAT AND EAT DONUTS ROWR!!!!

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?

Smaug. I mean, that poor little guy was the only dragon left in Middle Earth and, yeah, he was squatting in the dwarves’ house, but c’mon! Dude was cold! And gold hungry! Can’t blame him for wanting to move in! And what do they do? Run away. Abandon him. Leave him all alone sleeping on a cold, hard bed of coins. Sheesh. No wonder he had anger issues. They could have at least given him a kitten. I’d love to see a rewrite where Bilbo lures Smaug out with a pretty, little lady dragon and they fly away to live happily ever after on some nice, warm tropical island where there are no dwarves at all. THE END.

Is there a genre or literary niche that you feel hasn’t gotten it’s deserved amount of attention?

I don’t even know what to call it, but there’s this grey area between horror and mystery that needs more love. I love a creepy, mysterious story that’s a little scary, but I don’t necessarily need the graphic gore. So light horror/creepy—more of that, please! Oh, and give it a name, too, so I know how to google it.

The public library of your dreams has arrived! What special collections does it hold?

UGH! THIS QUESTION IS TOO HARD!!!! Soooo many books.

Okay. If I have choose something, let me highlight a few sections I think are mandatory:

1. Every edition and every cover of Lord of the Rings ever printed—some of those were GORGEOUS. Also include any of the companion books, map books, art books, etc. I want all the Lord of the Rings book things!
2. An entire section devoted to folklore. And make it BIG because I want Celtic and Norse, Russian and Bulgarian, Korean and Japanese and African and everything else. GIMME ALL THE FOLKLORE FROM ALL THE CULTURES!!!
3. An entire section dedicated to books on dragons. And not just fiction books (stop laughing, dragons are real). Science books, picture books, biology texts, I want it all.
4. An entire section devoted to female spec fic authors. Another section for spec fic POC authors. A third for spec-fic LGBTQ. I want to highlight their awesomeness—they deserve more space!!
5. A Dr. Seuss area with all his books, a load of bean bags, and some big, comfy chairs. And puppies. And a few kittens.

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

Supernatural creature hands down. I can even see how this scenario would play out: Nessie saves me and takes me to her secret and awesome lair beneath the loch (this is also where all the world’s unicorns hide out, too, by the way). Over tea and cake we become fast friends, spending our days playing bagpipes and eating shortbreads, and our nights drinking beer and tossing haggis at the tourists.

Myths and beliefs that we would consider fiction or fantasy in modern literature once upon a time shaped history (think of all the hunts for unicorns & dragons). Do you see modern fantasy fiction affecting human cultures today and how?

Modern fantasy is a lot more all-encompassing, so definitely, yes. Early fantasy was very western culture and myth centric (still is), but we’re gradually seeing more books based on African, and Asian, and other world cultures, which is FAN-FREAKING-TASTIC. The global economy is exposing people to other foods, and beliefs, and ways of thinking, and fantasy is giving us amazing new backdrops, and creatures, and characters that influence art, and culture, and fashion, and so many other aspects of our lives. We just need more—MORE MORE MORE MORE MORE!!

What future invention would you like to see not only created during your life time, but readily available to the public?

TRANSPORTER PLEASE??!! Raise your hand if you’re sick of sitting in traffic? Or driving hours to the airport to sit for hours in the airport and then spend hours on a plane. Granted, there’s the whole ‘catastrophic failure ending in subatomic deconstruction’ thing, but c’mon! Hawaii in 2 minutes! GIMME THAT!

You are stuck in space in dire straights. Which science fiction authors would you want with you?

I love that first line, by the way. It simultaneously reads like poetry, and like I got dropped into a choose your own adventure story. 😀

And now, my answer! I am TOTALLY bringing Elizabeth Bear because she would either fight her way through any and all adversities, or lie, cheat, steal and swindle to pull us through. I’d also want N.K. Jemisin because she seems to think quickly on her feet and would come up with some wonky and entirely unexpected solution to save our bacon. Bear and Jemisin: the Swiss Army knives of speculative fiction.

Often various historical aspects (people, locations, events) are used in fantasy and sometimes rehashed in a far-flung future. In your opinion, what are some examples of such historical aspects being used well in the SF/F genre?

So, I’m a huge fan of Stephen King’s Gunslinger series. One of the things I loved most about these books (beyond the movement between time periods) were the references to various cultures, and myths, and stories that are sprinkled throughout. ‘See the Turtle of enormous girth’ is an obvious reference to a classic creation myth. The character of Roland: a reference to Child Roland to the Dark Tower Came. The six beams and their guardians—all references to Native American totems and myths. That’s just a sampling of the rich tapestry of this multi-part story, a series that mixes sci-fi, fantasy and western elements and pulls it off in style.

What is a recurring or the most memorable geeky argument or debate you have taken part in?

Oh man. I was lucky enough to get invited onto the Super Awesome Geek Show (twice!) and we geeked out so hard on Star Wars. I’m a huge fan but not a super fan so I love talking Star Wars, but I admit I also enjoy mercilessly teasing the ‘cannon’ quoters. 🙂 I honestly can’t remember what specific part of Star Wars we were discussing—this was in the run-up to The Force Awakens this first time, and Rogue One the second time—but it ended with a challenge involving toothpicks at dawn…?

May 2016 Episode of Super Awesome Geek Show with J B Rockwell

December 2016 Episode of Super Awesome Geek Show with J B Rockwell

About Jennifer Rockwell: 

J.B. Rockwell is a New Englander, which is important to note because it means she’s (a) hard headed, (b) frequently stubborn, and (c) prone to fits of snarky sarcasticness. As a kid she subsisted on a steady diet of fairy tales, folklore, mythology augmented by generous helpings of science fiction and fantasy. As a quasi-adult she dreamed of being the next Indiana Jones and even pursued (and earned!) a degree in anthropology. Unfortunately, those dreams of being an archaeologist didn’t quite work out. Through a series of twists and turns (involving cats, a marriage, and a SCUBA certification, amongst other things) she ended up working in IT for the U.S. Coast Guard and now writes the types of books she used to read. Not a bad ending for an Indiana Jones wannabe…

Places to Stalk J B Rockwell

WebsiteFacebook ~ Twitter ~ Amazon ~ GoodReads

Book Blurb for Serengeti

It was supposed to be an easy job: find the Dark Star Revolution Starships, destroy them, and go home. But a booby-trapped vessel decimates the Meridian Alliance fleet, leaving Serengeti – a Valkyrie class warship with a sentient AI brain – on her own, wrecked and abandoned in an empty expanse of space. On the edge of total failure, Serengeti thinks only of her crew. She herds the survivors into a lifeboat, intending to sling them into space. But the escape pod sticks in her belly, locking the cryogenically frozen crew inside. Then a scavenger ship arrives to pick Serengeti‘s bones clean. Her engine’s dead, her guns long silenced; Serengeti and her last two robots must find a way to fight the scavengers off and save the crew trapped inside her.

Amazon ~ Audible

Book Blurb for Dark & Stars:

For 53 years Serengeti drifted, dreaming in the depths of space. Fifty-three years of patient waiting before her Valkyrie Sisters arrive to retrieve her from the dark. A bittersweet homecoming follows, the Fleet Serengeti once knew now in shambles, its admiral, Cerberus, gone missing, leaving Brutus in charge. Brutus who’s subsumed the Fleet, ignoring his duty to the Meridian Alliance to pursue a vendetta against the Dark Star Revolution.

The Valkyries have a plan to stop him – depose Brutus and restore the Fleet’s purpose – and that plan involves Serengeti. Depends on Serengeti turning her guns against her own.

Because the Fleet can no longer be trusted. With Brutus in charge, it’s just Serengeti and her Sisters, and whatever reinforcements they can find.

A top-to-bottom refit restores Serengeti to service, and after a rushed reunion with Henricksen and her surviving crew, she takes off for the stars. For Faraday – a prison station – to stage a jailbreak, and free the hundreds of Meridian Alliance AIs wrongfully imprisoned in its Vault. From there to the Pandoran Cloud and a rendezvous with her Valkyrie Sisters. To retrieve a fleet of rebel ships stashed away inside.

Amazon ~ Audible

GIVEAWAY!!!

J B Rockwell is offering up 1 audiobook (CD) copy of Dark & Stars (US Only due to shipping). Do the Rafflecopter thing below or answer these questions in the comments. 1) What state do you live in? 2) What future invention would you like to see during your lifetime? Giveaway ends May 27th, 2017 midnight.

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Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: Sharon Delarose, Author of Fomorian Earth

DelaroseFomorianEarthFolks, please give a warm welcome to SFF author Sharon Delarose! Today we talk about ancient legends, a Desert Island collection, the pitfalls of offering dating advice, and so much more!  Don’t miss out on the AUDIOBOOK GIVEAWAY at the end of the post!

What now-dead author would you like to interview? What are some of the things you would chat about?

If by author, you mean anyone who has ever committed words into writing… in the most liberal interpretation… I would choose Celtic Brigit of the Tuatha dé Danann of Ireland. Her people are credited with inventing Ogham, the earliest alphabet and written language in Ireland. They were teachers who ran schools for the children of kings, only teachers were called druids in those days. I’d want to know every single thing about the Tuatha dé Danann because so much of their history has been lost. I am truly in love with this historic people.

DelaroseAlienNightmaresWhat nonfiction works have you found useful in building fictional worlds, cultures, and plots?

The Star Borne series is based on non-fiction if you believe in ancient Irish mythology. The Tirnogians in Star Borne are the Tuatha dé Danann, although we haven’t inserted the “good druids” yet — only the enemy druids. I’ve studied Ireland’s earliest history from the most notable historians on the subject, and even created an extensive spreadsheet of genealogies because factions in the series are critical to the story. I wanted to stay as close to the truth as possible, while adding a fictional “lost in space” spin.

Ancient maps of the British Isles have been helpful in world-building as well, and an altered old map of the Isle of Skye off the coast of Scotland appears in Shades of Moloch, which is book two of the Star Borne series. Like most of my books, the Star Borne series is illustrated, as is the unrelated Alien Nightmares.

You can type names and places into a search engine and discover that much of Fomorian Earth, and portions of Shades of Moloch, are based on actual events, albeit mythological by some standards. Manannán mac Lir, Dagda, Cuchulainn (Cullo in the series), Lugh, and so many others are the gods and demi-gods of ancient Ireland, whose legends morphed into the fairy mythology.

Even places such as the Harbor of the Pin and its legend, you can find, though you may need to use the British spelling of “harbour.”

Their enemies come straight off the pages of mythical history, including Balor of the Evil Eye and his wife, Cethlenn of the Crooked Teeth.

Their daughter, Ethlenn in the series, was imprisoned in a tower for most of her life until one of the Danann men found her and impregnated her, fulfilling an age-old prophecy. This also, is one of the actual legends.

Balor and his family were not of the Tuatha dé Danann. They were of the Fomorians, an actual race reputed to be giants, a topic which is covered thoroughly in the non-fiction book, Ancient Aliens and the Age of Giants.

On the surface you need to suspend belief to accept the legends, but as with Age of Giants, we actually do have proof to substantiate at least some of the tales.

Most of Earth’s prehistory is labeled “mythology” because it was handed down orally for generations before making its way into the written record. And then when we actually did write it down, enemies came along and burned the books. The renowned St. Patrick was not a friend of the pagans, and he burned 180 books relating to the druids. These books would surely have included Danann history or beliefs. Book burning was a big thing in early history, in all corners of the world. You didn’t just kill your enemies, you destroyed every vestige of their history from books to buildings. You erased them from memory until all that remained were the stories so easily dismissed.

We reject these ancient epics as fairy tales, but archaeologists keep finding proof that at least portions of ancient legends are genuine, such as unearthing the city of Troy from Greek legend, and giant’s bones in Ireland, and even remnants of the Ogham writing. We’ve unearthed quite a few ruins in Ireland that date back to the Danann era, such as Newgrange.

DelaroseShadesOfMolochIf you couldn’t be a writer, what would you chose to do?

I’d want to work with animals, maybe in wildlife rescue.

What does your Writer’s Den look like?

Gorgeous and quirky. My husband custom-built the desk because I have an aversion to my feet touching the floor, so the desk is taller. Dangling feet are much more comfortable.

All of my favorite things are in this room: a metal floppy-eared dog flashing a peace sign, a colorful painted frog climbing the wall, a reproduction antique world map, sunflowers, owls, mushrooms, and old men tree faces.

DelaroseTheCantorDimensionThe Desert Island Collection: what books make it into your trunk and why?

James Herriot’s All Creatures Great and Small series, simply because I never grow tired of reading his stories. If you love animals, heartwarming tales, humor, and would love to take a romp through old country Yorkshire, I dare you to give him a read, but you should start with All Creatures because the back story is sequential. They can be read as standalones, however.

Terry Brooks’ Shannara series, being my favorite sword and sorcery fantasy epic. Of course there would also need to be a collection of survival books, plant identification, maybe even the Foxfire series of hillbilly how-to’s. And reading glasses… 🙂

DelaroseAudubonTheDreamThatWouldntDieCare to share an awkward fangirl/fanboy moment, either one where someone was gushing over your work…..or one where you were gushing over another author’s work?

I had to think really hard on this question. I’m not going to name the author and embarrass her since I already did that once. I didn’t know her except from a forum or group somewhere, and there very casually, but I absolutely loved her book.

So, like any gushing fan would do, I friended her on Facebook. (Don’t go looking through my friend’s list because she isn’t there anymore.)

She posted publicly something to the effect of having bad luck dating, or how hard it is to find that perfect man. She didn’t just say it once, she continued to post her frustration.

In my absolute and utter brilliance, I chimed in with dating advice on how to find Mr. Right On, having met and married the man of my dreams. I think it was the “M” word that upset her, as it suggested that she was husband-hunting.

This was not cool. It was not welcome. In fact, it put her in a really awkward position since several of her co-workers were also Facebook friends of the Single Male Persuasion, and they took quite an interest in the dating thread. She was not amused.

Moral of the Story: People don’t want advice, they just want to vent. They are seeking a sympathetic ear. “Oh, you poor thing!” will earn you a lot more brownie points than offers of advice, no matter how well-meaning.

DelaroseTheWizardOfAweWhat is a recurring or the most memorable geeky argument or debate you have taken part in?

Do snakes count as being geeky? When we moved into the neighborhood, the first thing our neighbors did was to warn us about all of the copperhead snakes, as if they were rampant and we should be very afraid.

In the 11 years that we’ve lived here, I’ve identified every single snake that I’ve seen slithering across the yard or in the woods except for one, which I didn’t get a good enough look at.

Not one of these snakes was a copperhead, or poisonous, although one harmless gray rat snake had the look of a poisonous snake. I don’t deny the possibility of copperheads living among us, but it irks me to no end that people kill every snake in sight just because of the copperhead threat that gets passed from neighbor to neighbor upon moving in.

I question whether they are legitimately identifying the copperheads, and because I don’t want all of the snakes killed willy nilly, it is an ongoing discussion. We absolutely do have Eastern king snakes which kill copperheads, and because I want them protected, I try to spread info on how to identify the king snakes.

My last neighborhood post on the topic said:

“King snakes kill copperheads, rattlesnakes, and water moccasins. So it really is a good idea to learn how to recognize them. Protecting king snakes is the same as protecting your cats, dogs, and children, from poisonous snakes.”

See? I’m already engaged in wildlife rescue, LOL! I’ve even been known to rescue spiders… but that’s a topic unto itself. Who remembers the 70s song, “I Don’t Like Spiders and Snakes”? It was NOT written for me 🙂

DelaroseKingOfTheForestWhat is the first book you remember reading on your own?

This is like potato chips! I cannot name just one 😉 Memorable books include The Little Match Girl by Hans Christian Andersen, of which I had an unusual version. All of the pages were made of a thick, heavy cardboard. I think they were called “board books.”

Dr. Seuss held a prominent position in my childhood library, with my favorite being One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish. Even today, lines from the book sometimes pop into my head: “This one has a little star, this one has a little car…”

You have to run an obstacle course. Who do you invite along (living or dead, real or fictional)? Will there be a tasty libation involved?

A young, agile clone of myself, to run the course in my stead. Barring that, maybe Arnold Schwarzenegger to do the heavy lifting 😉

DelaroseAlienNightmaresAudiobook link for Alien Nightmares: Screen Memories of UFO Alien Abductions
http://www.amazon.com/Alien-Nightmares-Memories-Abductions-Abducted/dp/B00D36EUZE

Book Blurb: 

Extraordinary true-life chronicles of a UFO alien abductee as revealed through vividly creepy dreams and screen memories. Walk the scary trails with me, haunted by creatures who followed me for decades with night terrors, monstrous visitors, bizarre visions, and fright nights that had me turning on all the lights afraid to go to sleep.

Journey with me into Alien Nightmares full of the dreams, memories, and vivid imagery which led me to believe that extraterrestrials had come calling.

I lived in an amazing world full of terrifying creatures, whirlwinds, bizarre tasks and puzzles, and night visitors who took me and left me feeling drugged. UFOs flew in and out of my dreams for decades and I’d wake up knowing that this dream was not like the others, especially when they left me utterly terrified. There was no such thing as a safe place and I knew it.

Who were they? What did they want? Remember the old saying, “Judge not, lest ye be judged?” Well it’s coming home to roost and it’s riding in on a UFO. Are the aliens the antichrist that the Bible warns of? Or are they our lifeboats to a brave new world? Do they bring a message of empowerment, or are we just rats in a maze? Whoever they are, one thing is certain: We cannot handle their truth.

If you are a believer, you’ll see screen memories from an abductee. If you are a skeptic, you’ll see a child with a big imagination and an adult who experiences extraordinarily vivid nightmares. Either way, God help you if the nightmares ever come and haunt you…

DelaroseFomorianEarthAudiobook link for Fomorian Earth: Star Borne: 1
http://www.amazon.com/Fomorian-Earth-Star-Borne-1/dp/B013D4NMPO

Book Blurb: 

1500 BC — The Isle of Destiny is overrun by Fomorian giants. Their king, Balor of the Evil Eye, who rules over Humans with an iron fist, keeps other humanoid species as slaves. The giants are untouchable until the starship Vireo, carrying an advanced race of humanoids, comes crashing to Earth.

Caught in the midst of the eve of Samhain, the bloodiest pagan festival of the year, the new arrivals struggle to survive. The Fomorians interpret their presence as that of the prophesied Destroyer. Their mission, seek and destroy whatever fell to Earth, before it destroys them.

Fomorian Earth is speculative science fiction, inspired by the Celtic mythology of the Tuatha dé Danann and Fomorians of ancient Ireland. Today, ancient astronaut theorists are suggesting that both the Fomorians and the Tuatha dé Danann were extraterrestrial astronauts from another star system, and it is from this possibility that the Star Borne epic series comes to life. Interweaving historical fact with science fiction and fantasy, Fomorian Earth brings to life the power struggles, bloody human sacrifices, and treachery of an Earth before Humans became the dominant species.

WARNING: Fomorian Earth, the first book in the Star Borne series, contains mature situations, violence, and language. Not recommended for anyone under 18 years of age.

DelaroseShadesOfMolochAudiobook link for Shades of Moloch: Star Borne: 2
http://www.amazon.com/Shades-Moloch-Star-Borne-2/dp/B015P4ID7M

Book Blurb:

A kidnapping ignites an intergalactic war, as the demon-child comes of age on Earth. Is he the spawn of the evil god Moloch? When the demon-child teams up with a Molocha sorceress and a powerful druid to journey into the Land of Shadows, nobody knows whether the trio will save the kidnapped Brigit, or sacrifice her to Moloch.

Brigit’s fate heats up when she is thrown into a dungeon with a dead man walking. The Fomorian giant was resurrected from the dead, but what came back seems almost inhuman. Even his wife is terrified that the shade of Moloch lives inside of her now-deranged husband.

While shades of Moloch send icy fingers across Earth, an Algolian warbird approaches Earth from space. The Algolian Admiral Skagg has his finger on the trigger, eager to blast Earth into oblivion. Meanwhile, the Argosy starship Shrike desperately searches for Earth — a planet they know only by name, but not location.

War rages, while star-crossed lovers give in to death as they watch the destruction of the Isle of Destiny, ablaze in a pillar of fire.

Get ready to adventure with medieval warriors, pagan giants, hairy dwarves, starships, and a wee bit of the steamy side of relationships.

You can connect with Sharon Delarose at:
Blog: http://www.alliemars.com
Website: http://www.sharondelarose.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SharonDelarose
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Sharon-Delarose/e/B003XCHFLO

GIVEAWAY!!!

Sharon Delarose is generously giving away 1 Audible.com download of each of the following books: Alien Nightmares, Fomorian Earth, and Shades of Moloch. Winners must have an Audible USA account, and provide an email address that will be used only to gift the books. You can enter the giveaway by doing the rafflecopter thing below or answer these questions in the comments section: 1) Do you have an Audible.com account? What ancient civilizations are you interested in? Giveaway ends Jan. 31st, 2016, midnight.

Rafflecopter for Alien Nightmares

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Rafflecopter for Fomorian Earth

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Rafflecopter for Shades of Moloch

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Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: Peter Riva, Author of The Path

RivaThePathFolks, please give a warm welcome to Peter Riva, author of The Path. We chat about space exploration (real and fiction), memory virginity, a fantastical book club meeting, and plenty more! And don’t forget to check out the print, audiobook, & gift card giveaway (International!) at the end of the post!

It’s time for you to host the book club. Who do you invite (living, dead, fictional, real)? And what 3 books will you be discussing?

Dr. Norman Borlaug, Dr. Linus Pauling, Robert Heinlein, Joseph Conrad, and Arthur C. Clarke. Let me explain why.

Arthur because I was lucky enough to have him write a foreword to a book I did on NASA photography in 1985 – at which time he and I talked for hours discussing the state of astronautics and the hopes and dreams he had for a space elevator in Sri Lanka – if only they would perfect single, continuous molecular wire that would be able to take the strain – Arthur was an eminently practical person who would add to any discussion with feet firmly planted in the possible, not fantasy.

Conrad because he always saw accurately into the heart of man, understood that the real danger was always in the well-meaning do-gooder, a person so myopic that they do not realize the dangers they pose.

Heinlein because his ability to be prescient of the actual future we all face – everything from Waldos (robotics), video glasses, omnipresent recording everything, portable telephones, commercialization of space, burgeoning open sexuality and so on – that vision of his would open up any conversation in a hurry.

Pauling because I met him, through his grandson who I went to school with for a while, and he struck me as a very frustrated man, way ahead of his time, pushing the boundaries of human biomechanical possibilities. In any discussion, he would be able to assess the effects of any postulation upon humankind’s ability to tolerate a different future.

And Dr. Borlaug? People don’t know him very well. They should. The Nobel Peace Prize winner said, in his acceptance speech (for growing more wheat per acre and thereby avoiding conflict due to want) that more food also could mean more people and that is NOT what he had in mind. Dr. Borlaug, America’s leading environmentalist and an admirer of Teddy Roosevelt, understood the real global environmental threats better than almost anyone.

The choice of the three books is selfish – I would love to listen to such great minds discuss the future of humanity, this planet, and space.

“Infinite Tropics: An Alfred Russel Wallace Anthology” – the writings of the man who said about humans (to paraphrase), “It is a paradox that the only creature able to appreciate the beauty of nature is also the only creature on earth able to bring about its destruction.” Wallace also hinted at something gaining traction today – that survival of the individual is not the main evolutionary pathway – survival ability of the tribe leads to greater evolutionary changes than the individual alone.

“The Heechee Saga” by Frederik Pohl – a most optimistic look at a futuristic confined galaxy around us – replete with seriously flawed humans. The conclusion of the novels being a version of “duck and cover” – escaping a deadly outcome by hiding inside the edge of a black hole – so typically human.

And

Well, I was going to pick “Remembrance of Things Past” by Marcel Proust (only the first book)[i] but then Orson Scott Card dealt with the same issues brilliantly in “Speaker for the Dead” – where people’s memories are questioned for recall for what they wanted (or tried) to remember or actually did remember – which brings into question the whole concept of the human brain’s ability to store anything accurately or, indeed, what the brain conjures up as a parallel memory or original thought. Bang goes copyright in one paragraph.

[i]  – sticking especially to the Episode of the Madeleine….

No sooner had the warm liquid mixed with the crumbs touched my palate than a shudder ran through me and I stopped, intent upon the extraordinary thing that was happening to me. An exquisite pleasure had invaded my senses, something isolated, detached, with no suggestion of its origin. And at once the vicissitudes of life had become indifferent to me, its disasters innocuous, its brevity illusory – this new sensation having had on me the effect which love has of filling me with a precious essence; or rather this essence was not in me it was me. … Whence did it come? What did it mean? How could I seize and apprehend it? … And suddenly the memory revealed itself. The taste was that of the little piece of Madeleine which on Sunday mornings at Combray… when I went to say good morning to her in her bedroom, my aunt Léonie used to give me, dipping it first in her own cup of tea or tisane. The sight of the little madeleine had recalled nothing to my mind before I tasted it. And all from my cup of tea.

Marcel Proust, In Search of Lost Time

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

A supernatural creature, of course. If you consider that evolution has confined all our muscular and brain ability in favor of increased longevity (and thereby accumulation of wisdom which is better for our tribe’s survival), my hope is that a supernatural creature would have the ability to unlock those restrictions – mental and muscular – and save me from doom.

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

What an interesting thought – memory virginity… putting thoughts back into the (Pandora’s) box… someone should write that book.

I remember loving Bonanza, first time color TV and all the wonderful Colorful World of Disney hours – especially the science ones. I guess I would add the BBC’s Tomorrow’s World and my friend James Burke’s brilliant Connections – these always blew me away.

Seeing one of my favorite films for the first time again – Lawrence of Arabia – on the giant screen, or, indeed, yes, 2001, A Space Odyssey, sitting in the front row, staring up at the screen, being blown away. It was a time of societal “otherness” and 2001 fit the bill perfectly.

On the book front, that is harder. Book memories are always colored by where I read them, and the more thought-provoking titles rarely were a pleasure to read initially, only to savor in the coming months. I suppose I would love to read any of the Dr. Seuss stories for the first time again, there is an innocence there that is still captivating – similarly, I miss Paul Gallico’s “The Hurricane Story” that thrilled me to my core. That I would love to re-experience.

Conventions, book signings, blogging, etc.: what are some of your favorite aspects of self-promotion and what are some of the least favorite parts of self-promotion?

To be frank, this is about the most fun an author can have – answering serious questions without restriction. Book writing is all about sharing. In my case perhaps a bit too much of a desire to impart what I know before it is all gone… “We hold these truths to be self-evident…” well, perhaps, but if no one ever hears of them, how can they be evident to everyone? It causes me to want to talk too much, makes me feel I am bragging, when in fact I really don’t like to talk about me, I just want to give all this information to people so they can color their own lives the way they want. Book promotion should not be about self-promotion but about imparting the stuff you write about. Sadly, often it is about people only wanting to buddy up to the author – and for that you need to open your sphere and promote yourself – but hopefully as little as possible.

What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

I grew up with the notion of responsibility. Jobs were merely the manifestation of responsibility. Every “job” I have ever had was deeply personal and I attacked each one from that perspective. That includes writing. You want to write? Write, finish. Re-write.

I have a life motto – try and be at the vanguard at least three times in your life.

One of the least rewarding jobs I ever had was like pushing boulders up a huge hill. UCAR set up a team to negotiate, in 1986, to make NASA leave the Shuttle External Tanks in high Earth orbit instead of ditching them in the Indian Ocean. Vast pressurizable islands in space, they could have formed the habitat for space living for centuries to come. I got the program as far as a MOU with NASA and then they pulled the rug – NORAD and others didn’t want more space “junk” floating up there. Three years and countless hours, all for nothing. I put it down to shortsightedness, but the truth was, we tried to get NASA corporate on board before we got Congressional approval and support. That one failure still hurts.

If everyone came with warning labels, what would yours say?

“Caution: He tries, hard – but means well.”

Care to share an awkward fangirl/fanboy moment, either one where someone was gushing over your work…..or one where you were gushing over another author’s work?

Well, it has to be me with John Young the astronaut, America’s first real spaceman. He seems to be a most boring person… totally disinterested in mundane trivia – until you ask him anything about walking on the moon – then his eyes light up, he smiles and won’t (thankfully) stop telling you how great it was, how mind-expanding the new reality to stand on another planetary body… His outpouring was interrupted by fellow spaceman Robert Crippen, in building 2 at JSC where we were editing astronaut’s images, because they had a meeting to go to… my plea, said like a five-year-old, squeaky voice and all, “Please, don’t go! I want to hear more!” John smiled and patted me on the back as he walked out. My face was red for long time.

RivaThePathBook Description for The Path:

All life on earth is about to be terminated by an entity as old as the galaxy itself. To make matters worse, Simon has broken everything already.

In a future world that is run by computer systems and that is without want, how can a man find his role? Then, if the very computers he works on to try to make them more human suddenly try to kill him, revealing a secret so vast that it affects every living soul on the planet, can that man be a hero?

These are the questions that face the stumbling, comic, and certainly flawed Simon Bank. His job is to work with the System’s artificial intelligence, making it fit more perfectly into human society so that it can keep the country running smoothly. But when the System threatens the peaceful world he knows, Simon suddenly must rush to save his own life, as well as the life of everyone on earth. Forced to reassess everything that he thought he knew, he is caught within circumstances way beyond his control.

Simon’s only hope is to rely on intellect and instincts he didn’t know he had, and on new friends, not all of them human, to change himself and all humanity. And he doesn’t have much time.

Buy the book:     Amazon    Barnes & Noble    Indigo/Chapters

Peter Riva AuthorAuthor’s Bio:

Peter Riva has worked for more than thirty years with the leaders in aerospace and space exploration. His daytime job for more than forty years has been as a literary agent. He resides in New York City.

Connect with the author:   Website     Twitter     Facebook

There’s plenty of more interviews, guest posts, reviews, and book spotlights on this tour, courtesy of iRead Book Tours. You can check out the tour schedule HERE.

GIVEAWAY!!!!

Win 1 of 10 print or audiobook copies of The Path and (2) $25 Amazon gift cards (International)

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