Audiobook Giveaway & Interview: Christine Padovan, Narrator of Slade: Team Greywolf

Folks, please give a warm welcome to Christine Padovan. She kindly let me pick her brain with questions and is also offering up Audible.com/UK audiobook copies of Slade: Team Greywolf or Kyrathaba Rising (winner’s choice). Scroll to the end of the post to check out that giveaway!

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

Wow, can it be a fictional character instead? I know for sure I would want former CIA agent, John Reese from ‘Person of Interest’ to save me, because he seems to be able to get himself out from certain death anytime it faces him! Or his colleague, former Army Intelligence Support Activity operative, Sameen Shaw. Either one would do nicely 🙂

If you could, what book or movie or TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

The Forever War by American author Joe Haldeman, telling the contemplative story of soldiers fighting an interstellar war between humans and the Taurans. It’s a fascinating story, spanning years via time travel through space, and showing the social changes that occur to mankind on Earth and where it takes them over time. So well written and great humor too, I’d love to read it again someday.

Another amazing story that really grabbed and stayed with me since I was a kid is A Wrinkle in Time by American writer Madeleine L’Engle, first published in 1963. I loved that the main character was a girl like me 🙂 – just loved the whole story.

Note that both stories have happy endings. I’m a positive person and truly believe in good overcoming bad 🙂 and that goodness will always prevail 🙂

What makes you fall in love with a story?

Something about the storyline has to really connect with me in some way. If the idea behind the story doesn’t grab my attention – like with Eva Gordon’s writing with her paranormal suspense stories, where there is personal development between the characters as well as action and drama happening around them, then I’m probably going to stop reading the story.

The writings of Ayn Rand are examples of stories that make me think – a story that takes a hard look at social conventions and makes you think more about your own beliefs from your heritage and upbringing, and gives you a different perspective from someone else’s viewpoint.

Back in 2011, you were part of a Star Wars fan web series. What attracted you to this project? What were some of the highlights for you?

The attraction was I’m a sci-fi geek – I also did on-camera and voice work for ‘Dark Frontier’, an online web series for Triple-FictionProductions.net, a Star Trek fan series that films out of Florida. I was a lesbian Captain, Alexia Mandell killed off in the beginning of the pilot episode, but was also a Ferengi bar owner named Madam Mirak. I briefly played a Vulcan captain, Captain Searon on another webisode. Voice – was show announcer and did some ‘engineer emergency announcements’ over the intercom 🙂 Folks can check out the live streaming webisodes at http://triple-fictionproductions.net/DarkFrontier.html .

‘Rise of the Rebellion’, the Star Wars fan series was very fun. I was approached at the time in 2011 through Voice123.com by Can Akdag who is in Turkey, to provide the voice dubbing for the actress playing Flora Milon on webisode 4, ‘Jefi Business’ of the show.

Your readers can catch the webisode here: https://vimeo.com/channels/456071/21038731

I’m the show announcer saying ‘previously, on ‘Rise of the Rebellion’ and Flora’s one line around
the 2:15 timemark.

What was challenging is the actress said her line extremely fast and I had to watch the clip Can sent me
over and over, and I practiced timing the voicing of her line to fit her mouth movements. It was hard to do,
but it did work out with the takes I emailed back to Can.

The highlight was getting this as a credit to my IMDb profile. The only disappointment is Can did this out of his love for Star Wars and not to make money, so before he used my dubbing lines for webisode 5 – where I had a few more lines than just one – he actually didn’t dub webisode 5 and ended up going on to other projects that he could make a living at.

If you couldn’t be a voice actor, what would you chose to do?

I have a degree in Psychology and used to do some clinical social work and neuro-psychology research, but I would really enjoy being a police detective or an FBI agent. I’m fascinated with what makes people commit crimes such as murders, and I love the ability to look at all the details and put the puzzle pieces together, to solve the crime (like Sherlock Holmes). I’m very much a person who is into details, and when I watch television or meet people in real life, I look closely at them and can usually figure out if they are ill, or been ill, etc. or see through them with whatever quirks they possess. I really like understanding what makes people tick!

What were you like as a kid? Did your kid-self see you going into book narration?

Ha! I don’t think any voice actor out there ever thought they would be a book narrator or voice actor of any sort, unless they had a dream of being a radio dj or show personality :-). I was a tomboy as a kid – loved being a jumping bean since I could walk. Anything to do with being active and being outdoors, that was me!

If you could sit down and have tea (or a beer) with 5 fictional characters, who would you invite to the table?

Well, one would be Sherlock Holmes (either the modern day version like Jonny Lee Miller’s character on ‘Elementary’ or the Granada series with the late Jeremy Brett). However, Sherlock Holmes probably wouldn’t give me the time of day! I’d be too uninteresting to him and he would probably sit there, quietly analyzing everyone else. (Or he would see I’m too much like him and he wouldn’t want to waste time talking to me!)

The others would be Spock, Ben-Hur (played famously by the late Charlton Heston in 1959), Claire Randall from Diana Gabaldon’s ‘Outlander’ series, and 13 year old, Meg Murry from ‘A Wrinkle in Time’. Wouldn’t that be an interesting little tea/wine party 😉

What is the first book you remember reading out loud to someone else?

‘The Story of Babar: The Little Elephant’ by Jean de Brunhoff to a class of kindergarteners when I was in 4th grade 🙂

Guess my narrating to listeners did start at a young age, but I didn’t know then that it would be a real career now!

Thanks for asking me all these great questions – I’ve really enjoyed this interview 🙂

 

About Narrator Christine Padovan:

Christine Padovan is a popular narrator with a warm, distinctive voice, who can make non-fiction stories sound compelling and interesting, with versatility in bringing characters to life in the world of fiction. Specializing in Romance, Self Development, and Sci-fi/Fantasy genres. Audible Editor Review of David Poole’s bio/memoir of NASCAR’s Tim Richmond: “…Christine Padovan’s captivating, lively delivery perfectly encapsulates Richmond’s freewheeling spirit and the kinetic energy of Poole’s prose. Her skillful performance makes this experience as bracing and compelling as a NASCAR race, making it difficult to pause after pressing play.” Winner, 2013 Best Audiobook for BADWATER by Toni Dwiggins –Goodreads.com/eFestivalofWords.com

 

Places to Stalk Christine Padovan

website ~ AudioFilefacebook ~ twitter ~ Audible ~ linkedin

Book Blurb for Slade: Team Greywolf

Runt, Cricket, is an honorary beta of Team Greywolf, an elite special ops branch of the Lycan Intelligence Agency. As a member, she poses as a human and collects forensic evidence. Because of her low rank, she is assigned in the rehabilitation of Prince Slade suffering from morphogenesis after his entire pack is murdered, and then his indoctrination as a member of their team. Babysit a psycho, domineering alpha? Not on her watch. To complicate matters, she lusts for Slade. Foolish. A runt can never take an alpha as a mate.

Slade has two choices. Honor his murdered kin and serve Team Greywolf, or once healed, obey King Conan and return to his territory with an alpha mate. Complicating his decision is his relentless desire for the hot sexy little she-wolf, Cricket.

Early into his recovery, Slade and Cricket are sent to investigate missing werewolves. An unstable werewolf seems hardly a match for a former Nazi werewolf bent on bringing on Ragnarok, the destruction of mankind.

Can they stop this evil regime, while conforming to pack law that forbids any chance of them fulfilling their desire for each other?

Amazon ~ Audible

Book Blurb for Kyrathaba Rising:

One hundred and seventy years from now, aliens decimate Earth. A relative handful of humans survive, hidden in deep subterranean enclaves that offer some protection from surface radiation. Although the main attack is now seven years in the past, one alien ship remains in orbit, and the conquerors are not content merely to let humanity lick its wounds…

Amazon ~ Audible

GIVEAWAY!!!

Christine is graciously offering up 3 copies of Slade, winner’s choice of Audible.com or Audible UK. Also, if paranormal shifter romance isn’t quite your cup of tea or if you already own this audiobook, each winner can request an Audible.com/UK copy of Kyrathaba Rising instead. Do the Rafflecopter thing below or answer these questions in the comments: 1) Have you ever watched a fan-made movie or series? 2) Which are you interested in more – Slade or Kyrathaba Rising? Giveaway ends May 5th, 2017, midnight.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Interview: Henry Herz, Author of When You Give An Imp A Penny

HerzWhenYouGiveAnImpAPennyFolks, please welcome author and editor Henry Herz to the blog again. I have thoroughly enjoyed his works (Nimpentoad & Beyond the Pale) and recently his newest release When You Give An Imp A Penny. Get ready for a lively interview that includes Lord of the Rings references, an appreciation of children’s stories for all ages, and plenty more!

1. If you could be an extra on a kids’ movie or TV show, what would it be?

What a terrific question! But, so difficult to answer given the many great choices. I think it would be a blast to have been an extra on The Incredibles, The Princess Bride, Shrek, Arthur and the Invisibles, Chicken Run, or Where the Wild Things Are.

2. Would you rather have a dragon, or be a dragon?

I think we first need to clarify what KIND of dragon. Are we talking silly dragons like Toothless (How to Train Your Dragon), H.R. Pufnstuf, Cassie (Dragon Tales), Puff the Magic Dragon, or Elliott (Pete’s Dragon)? Perhaps powerful but kindly dragons like Saphira (Eragon), Falkor (The Neverending Story) or Ramoth (The Dragonriders of Pern)? Or the terrifying killing machines Vermithrax Pejorative (Dragonslayer), Fafner (Der Ring des Nibelungen), Norbert (Harry Potter), Ancalagon (The Silmarillion), Yevaud (A Wizard of Earthsea) or Smaug (The Hobbit)?

Since I enjoy spending time with my family and writing, I should probably remain human, and opt for a dragon pet, so long as it obeys my will. “It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him.”

HerzNimpentoad3. If you couldn’t be a writer, what would you chose to do?

If I couldn’t be a writer, I’d be a board game designer. It’s a fun combination of being analytical and creative. I actually designed a submarine warfare game MANY years ago and sold it to SPI, but they went out of business before the game could be made. Not my fault!

4. If you could go enjoy a meal in a fictional world, where would that be, and what would you eat?

Since I am a Lord of the Rings fanatic, I have to say I would eat whatever Galadriel’s elves are serving for dinner in Middle Earth’s Lothlorien, or whatever Finarfin’s elves are serving in Valmar (the capital of Valinor in The Silmarillion). I’m guessing vegan, but with plenty of good wine.

5. If you were asked to create the syllabus for a college class in children’s literature, what HerzMonsterGooseNurseryRhymesbooks would be on there as required reading? As passing discussion?

Creating a syllabus for a college class in children’s literature would be a two-edged sword. It would be a riot to do, but it would be HARD to pick only a few to cover. Some personal favorites include:
Younger Kids: Where the Wild Things Are (Sendak), This is Not My Hat (Klassen), A Sick Day for Amos McGee (Stead), The Cat in the Hat (Seuss), Frog and Toad Are Friends (Lobel)
Older Kids: The Hobbit (Tolkien), The Book of Three (Alexander), A Wrinkle in Time (L’Engle), The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Lewis), Charlotte’s Web (White), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Dahl).

6. What is a recurring or the most memorable geeky argument or debate you have taken part in?

My answer to your question 2?

See also the Six Degrees of Sauron web application I co-designed. The Dark Lord is closer than you think!

HerzBeyondThePale7. What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

That was a LONG age ago. As in carved stone tablets… Probably a Dr. Seuss book. Perhaps One Fish Two Fish, Red Fish Blue Fish.

8. Finally, what upcoming events and works would you like to share with the readers?

Well, my new picture book, WHEN YOU GIVE AN IMP A PENNY, is just out from Pelican Publishing. Before you lend an imp a penny, there’s something you should know—such a simple act of generosity could set off a side-splitting chain of events! A colorful picture book full of mythology, mischief, and magic, WHEN YOU GIVE AN IMP A PENNY shows us just what happens when an accident-prone—but well-intentioned—imp comes along asking for favors! The same writer/illustrator duo that brought you MONSTER GOOSE NURSERY RHYMES brings to life a comedy of fabled proportions.

HerzWhenYouGiveAnImpAPennyFrom tracking mud on the floor to setting the broom on fire, this clumsy little imp causes accidents wherever he goes, but he’s determined make things right again. The only thing it will cost his host is a little patience—and maybe a bit of time cleaning up some messes! It won’t be long before this troublemaker has won over the entire family (except for the cat) with his irrepressible charm.

I have three more picture books scheduled for publication. LITTLE RED CUTTLEFISH (Pelican, 2016) is an aquatic retelling of LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD, but with a sassy cephalopod protagonist. MABEL & THE QUEEN OF DREAMS (Schiffer, 2016) is a bedtime picture book inspired by Mercutio’s soliloquy in Romeo and Juliet. Little Mabel was an expert at not going to sleep. But Mom had the Queen of Dreams in her quiver of bedtime tales. The Queen paints children’s dreams, so she only visits when their eyes are closed. DINOSAUR PIRATES (Sterling, 2017) is a comical mashup of two kid favorites. A T-rex with a piratey patois!? Cap’n Rex leads his dinosaur pirates in search of booty. As they encounter obstacles in their quest, the apex predator “encourages” his crew to think outside the box. When the treasure is found, Cap’n Rex wants to keep it for himself, but the clever crew turns the tables on him.

I’m thrilled to be moderating a children’s literature panel at WonderCon in Los Angeles on March 26. The panelists will be award-winning authors and illustrators Bruce Hale (CLARK THE SHARK), Jon Klassen (THIS IS NOT MY HAT), Laura Numeroff (IF YOU GIVE A MOUSE A COOKIE), and Dan Santat (THE ADVENTURES OF BEEKLE: THE UNIMAGINARY FRIEND), and Antoinette Portis (WAIT).

Places to Find Henry Herz and his two talented sons Josh and Harrison

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Book Giveaway & Interview: Geoff Camphire, Author of the Charlie Dead Series

CamphireCharlieDead&SoCalledZombie ApocalpseEveryone, please welcome Geoff Camphire, author of the humorous zombie Charlie Dead series! We discourse on zombie movies, what a zombie obstacle course would entail, what zombies symbolize in modern society, and plenty more. Also, don’t miss out on the paperback giveaway (US only please) – scroll to the end for details on that.

If you could be an extra on a zombie movie or TV series, what would it be?

Getting shot in the forehead with a crossbow on “The Walking Dead” would be pretty darn cool. I’d make a great zombie. I’m almost lifelike. Almost.

How does it feel, I wonder, to be a treated like a monster? In my CHARLIE DEAD trilogy (‪http://tinyurl.com/peqqlls), teenager Charlie Dunlap, newly infected with the zombie virus, fears he’s about to find out. These young-adult sci-fi novels explore life among the undead in a post-apocalyptic, dystopian America. I hope people enjoy it as much as shows like “iZombie” and “The Walking Dead.”

What’s the most interesting gross fact you know?

If punctured, the human heart can squirt blood more than 30 feet. Which can make it hard to catch it in your mouth.

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death, would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

Definitely a supernatural creature. Specifically, a zombie. Even more specifically, it would be Wendell Reed, the main zombie character in my CHARLIE DEAD series.

Charlie is a teenager trying to avoid becoming a zombie, and Wendell, for a variety of reasons, tries to help him. In doing so, Wendell risks being utterly destroyed himself.

Of course, for a zombie, this is as close to “certain death” as one comes. After writing about Wendell for years, I’ve grown quite fond of the big, undead lug. So, would I save him if I had to choose someone to rescue? I suppose — but, fortunately, as an author, I can do whatever I want!

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

One year, when I was a kid, “The Exorcist” aired on network TV for the first time on Halloween. It was an edited version, but still pretty scary. I remember coming home from trick-or-treating, planting myself on the carpet in front of the tube in our basement game room, and gobbling candy bars alone in the dark. It was like an out-of-body experience.

At one point, a commercial came on — and suddenly I became aware of myself. Bathed in the glow of the TV screen. Scared halfway out of my mind. And grinning like a madman. Looking back, I understand now what a pivotal moment that was.

CamphireCharlieDead&TheSeedsOfZombieChaosHow does modern pop culture influence your work? Do modern cultural references date a piece or add touchstones for the reader?

Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh, which really was ground zero for the explosion of zombie movies that’s given the world its modern vision of the living dead. I’ve never shaken the infection — or the hunger to spread the zombie virus.

Of course, as an adult now, I experience pop culture a little differently. After enjoying the “Harry Potter” and “Hunger Games” books along with my kids, I started wondering why young-adult zombie literature didn’t offer a series of comparable quality. So I wrote my own.

People today are fascinated with zombies — and for good reason. The planet is swarming with mortal dangers, existential threats and systemic efforts to take over our lives. We’re all afraid of being gobbled up, turned into zombies. Mindless zombies and the walking dead invite us to tackle the hard questions of free will and what it means to be really alive. The real stumper isn’t “How do we kill zombies?” but “How to do we live with the reality of zombies among us?”

And I want my post-apocalyptic world to be familiar, but not too much. Without dropping a lot of references to things like specific products or movies, I try to paint a picture of people as they live today, struggling and striving, often unsuccessfully, to make their world normal again. Turns out, that’s hard to do when there are zombies everywhere.

Reality in my fiction: how important is it? Lengthy travel, cussing, and bathroom breaks happen in real life. How do you address these mundane occurrences in your writings?

How important is reality in my fiction? I’m not sure that reality is particularly important in my reality. I write about zombies, after all.

That said, I don’t feel like art is obligated to be absolutely faithful to all the mundane facets of real life. Sure, fiction is most entertaining when it feels somehow plausible — when characters’ motivations make sense, when the words coming out of their mouths sound like things they’d say, and when events unfold within the rules of a reality established by the story. So reality is important. But it’s the reality I create that matters. And that reality isn’t filled with paragraphs punctuated by trips to the toilet.

Over the years, are the changes in society reflected in today’s villains and heroes?

Our heroes have stayed mostly the same over time. They’ve always had to overcome obstacles, externally and internally. That’s what makes them heroes. And they’re important, sure. But if I’m being honest, I am much more interested in our villains — specifically, our monsters — and what they say about us.

Creepy as it might sound, I take inspiration from the simmering panic I hear in the voices of ordinary people. When you ask people about their fears, what do they talk about? Faceless enemies, terror groups, existential threats. A growing sense of freedom being taken away. Outsize control exerted by governmental, religious and economic forces. And the desperation to somehow escape becoming just another one of society’s dead-eyed drones.

That’s why we’re drawn to tales of zombies. Most zombie stories focus on the fight-or-flight response to attack by the unliving. But in real life, there’s no escape. You certainly can’t avoid death. Even before that, there are forms of “zombification” that find you, no matter what. You can never completely get away from the drudgery of work, the limits placed on your free choice by society, and — maybe most important — the tendency of people to treat each other as lesser-than, inhuman monsters.

We’re all running from the zombie plague, and we’re trying to figure out what it means to really be alive. So I wanted to write about the ways we learn to live, hopefully, in a reality that’s always is and always will be overrun with zombies.

CamphireCharlieDead&TheSpoilesOfZombieCombatIf you were sent on a survival quest which other 4 zombie fiction authors would you take with you?

Richard Matheson, Max Brooks, Robert Kirkman and Seth Grahme-Smith. Why? Realistically speaking, I don’t think I’m going to last long on any “survival quest.” I’m going to be one of the first to go down. So, I figure, I might as well enjoy some scintillating conversation with innovative intellects before I become somebody’s lunch.

What book should be made into a game (card, PC, board, etc.) and why? Is there a specific character who you would want to play in this game?

This question really is not fair, because I feel like I’m being set up to self-promote. But I’m taking the bait. Naturally I feel like my CHARLIE DEAD books would make the most amazing video game ever. Personally, I’d want to be Charlie. But others might choose to be characters like the undead Emma Fletcher, buddy Sam Curtis, or the zombified secret agent Wendell Reed.

Then the good guys face off against the bad guys. And not just rabid zombies. The villains are legion — including the loony zealots of Orthodox Life Church, the ruthless opportunists of Nolegys Corporation, and the jackbooted thugs of the Community Health Enforcement Watch, or CHEW. The “Zombie Combat” tournaments in the video game could be just as wild as those featured in the books, where normals and zombies go head to head. And heads do roll

What do you do when you are not writing?

When I’m not writing zombie fiction, I’m a husband, a father, a freelance journalist, and a communications guru who runs a public awareness campaign reaching over 50 million people a year with information and resources about science education. Also I watch zombie movies. Lots and lots of zombie movies.

What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

Aside from slender, Dr. Seuss-style children’s books, the first real book I remember reading by myself was “A Wrinkle in Time.” I was in elementary school, and I can remember being blown away by the bizarre combination of supernatural fantasy and science-fiction, the careening adventure and high drama, the wrenching emotion, and — maybe most — the characters I wanted to know better. What a storyteller L’Engle was! What a story!

You have to run a zombie obstacle course. Who do you invite along (living or dead, real or fictional)? Will there be a tasty libation involved?

Merlot. I think a simple red would pair best with my friend Gavin, who is catastrophically clumsy. Gavin would make excellent zombie bait, I think. Outrunning him would provide me with my escape. And since red wine goes with red meat, I might be tempted to share some with the zombies feasting on Gavin. Then again, I just might save the bottle for myself. I do like to have a drink while I’m enjoying a show. Buh-bye, Gavin!

CamphireCharlieDead&SoCalledZombie ApocalpseBook Blurb for Charlie Dead & the So-Called Zombie Apocalypse:

Zombies, zombies, zombies! How does it feel to be one of the walking dead? Hunted? Not free? Never allowed to live the life you choose? Charlie Dunlap, newly infected with the zombie virus, fears he is about to find out.

Charlie doesn’t want to become one of the mindless corpses at Norwood High School, where his few friends include the zombified Emma Fletcher. In this post-apocalyptic Armageddon, undead hordes are part of the horror of daily life.

Just as Charlie is losing hope, though, a mysterious government agent appears at the door, raising questions about the boy’s late mother. How was the vanished scientist connected to the origin of the virus? Why was this terrible plague unleashed on the world? And who is now targeting zombies for persecution?

Charlie, recruited to aid in the investigation, faces each new adventure with a dose of gallows humor and fading hope for a cure. But Charlie knows there’s more than his own fate on the line. At stake is the power to control the whole human race.

Will Charlie survive? Who can he trust? In a world at war with the living dead, it’s not always easy to tell who the real monsters are.

From author Geoff Camphire comes this high-flying, pulse-pounding zombie novel series, a new kind of dystopian science fiction. “CHARLIE DEAD and the So-Called Zombie Apocalypse” is Book 1 of the acclaimed CHARLIE DEAD series.

Places to Find Geoff Camphire & his Charlie Dead series

The CHARLIE DEAD books are available as paperbacks and ebooks on Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/peqqlls. Go online to check out the first installment — “CHARLIE DEAD & the So-Called Zombie Apocalypse” — and click “Look Inside” in the upper left corner to read the first chapter. You can “like” the Charlie Dead Book Series on Facebook and follow @Geoff_Camphire on Twitter for news and updates. And learn about CHARLIE DEAD and more by author Geoff Camphire at www.geoffcamphire.com. Also, catch him on GoodReads.

GIVEAWAY!!!

Geoff Camphire is pleased to offer one free full set of CHARLIE DEAD paperbacks — Books 1, 2 & 3 — to the first U.S. resident who, after this Q&A appears online, emails him at geoffcamphire@yahoo.com with his or her favorite quotation from the first installment, “CHARLIE DEAD & the So-Called Zombie Apocalypse.” Join the zombie feast! Bon appetit! You can check out the first couple of chapters of Book 1 over on Amazon using their ‘Look Inside’ feature. Hint: This gives you plenty of awesome quotes from the book!