Audible Giveaway & Review: The Book of Dragons by E. Nesbit

Scroll to the bottom for the giveaway!

Narrator: Karen Krause

Publisher: Listen2aBook.com (2017)

Length: 4 hours 53 minutes

Series: Books 1-8 The Book of Dragons

Author’s Page

This charming collection of children’s tales all center around dragons of one ilk or another. Each story can be read as a stand alone. I’ve had the pleasure of listening to and reviewing two of these stories previously and when I saw that he narrator had 8 stories in one collection, I couldn’t resist. I know it would be good stuff and I wasn’t disappointed. These stories are great for kids and fun for adults too.

The Book of Beasts – This is one of the stories I have previously listened to and reviewed. It was just as good the second time around. The child king Lionel finds a book once owned by one of his distant grandsires. Like all good kids, he plays with it and sets a giant butterfly free. He’s warned not to do so again, but he releases yet another fantastical critter (a bird of paradise), and then another (the dragon!), which threatens his kingdom and he must make it right again. A hippogriff and manticore come into play too! 5/5

Uncle James – This story was so cute and it was mostly because there are cute little dog-sized elephants! Who doesn’t want a pet elephant that can snuggle on your lap and eat popcorn while you watch Flight of the Dragons? This tale takes place in Rotundia where all the sizes are backwards and a dragon has shown up that wants a princess as a present. Now this isn’t your typical ‘save the princess from the dragon’ story, as young Tom found out. By the way, keep your eye on Uncle James. He may not be trustworthy! 5/5

The Deliverers of Their Country – This was my favorite out of all the stories. It starts with young Effie getting something in her eye and that something is a teensy tiny dragon! Go ahead, squeal in love and excitement. I know I did. Who doesn’t want to adopt such a little dragon? However, these small dragons keep popping up throughout the land and they are starting to wreak havoc. Now Effie and her friend Harry have to find a way to reduce the number of dragons. It’s a clever solution to an over-population problem. 6/5

The Ice Dragon – Imagine North Pole dwarves dressed in seal skin. Now toss in an ice dragon. Lastly, make room for two adventurous kids, George and Jane, who just wanted to see the Northern Lights. things go ever so wrong. This story was actually a little gruesome because it has a bit of a body count. It’s not gory but I was a little surprised at little bit of darkness that crept into this story. Still, it was clever and the kids survive, so all’s well. 5/5

The Island of the Nine Whirlpools – This was an interesting one. A childless Queen goes to an old witch begging for a child and the witch takes her jewels and uses them to whip up a baby girl. The Queen is totally satisfied but the King wanted a boy. So obviously, that makes a wedge between the couple. When the daughter reaches a certain age, he banishes her to an island that is protected by big beasties, like a dragon. Her mother, the Queen, and the witch both make sacrifices to make it possible for her to one day be rescued. I liked that the story hinged upon the love for an old crone. However, the princess to be rescued seemed rather daft to me, which I didn’t really care for. 4/5

The Fiery Dragon – This is the second story in this collection that gives a nod to St. George, a famous dragon slayer. Granddaughter Sabrinetta has got some skills on her which is a good thing because her unscrupulous cousin, Prince Tiresome, tosses her out of the dragon-proof tower to deal with the fiery dragon. Luckily she has a great friend, Elfin the pigkeeper, who can help her. That’s another thing I really like about these stories – so often there’s a ‘commoner’ that is essential to solving whatever dragon issue there is. 5/5

The Dragon Tamers – This had a little steampunky feel to it. John is a blacksmith and he and his wife have a new baby that cries often and loudly. Yet even with that intermittent noise, John has noticed an odd sound coming from the basement. He finally has to go down there for coal and he meets this dragon that needs rivets to repair his wing. The dragon isn’t shy about telling John what he plans to do once his wing is repaired: eat all the people including John and his family. Now John has to outsmart this dragon and that loud baby gets to play a key role in the subterfuge. It was clever and fun. 5/5

Kind Little Edmond – This is the second story I had the privilege to enjoy previously. This is the tale of young Edmond, who was filled to the brim with curiosity, so much so that he often irritated his elders. But not his loving and doting grandmother. Edmond decides to explore the nearby mountains and hears some very odd sounds. He meets and helps a mythical beast, a manticore, who rewards him by telling him magnificent tales. This was a great little tale and I really enjoyed it. I especially enjoyed this one as the tale has this underlying current about the value of learning things for oneself. 5/5

The Last of the Dragons – This great little story turns the typical princess + dragon + prince story on it’s head. Tradition requires the princess to be rescued from the dragon by a prince. However, this princess would much rather rely on her own fencing skills. The dragon isn’t too thrilled about the idea of coming out, threatening a nice young lady, and then being slain for the sake of tradition. This prince is up for doing something different. Why should he have to do all the hard work? It’s a great story to finish out the book. 5/5

I received a free copy of this book via The Audiobook Worm.

The Narration: Karen Krause does such a lovely job with this classic. Her little kid voices are so believable yet she is also great at doing grumpy elderly characters as well. Her voices for the various beasts are also fun. You can tell that she enjoyed narrating these tales as much as I enjoyed listening to them. Great performance all around!

What I Liked: Lovely cover art; it’s great to see these classics come to audiobook; a charming collection of dragon tales; the author is great at switching things up; kids and adults, boys and girls, rich and poor, clever and kind – just a great representation with these characters; great narration.

What I Disliked: Nothing – such a great little book. 

Check out more reviews on the blog tour.

About Author E. Nesbit:

Edith (E.) Nesbit was a master at weaving imagination and real life into timeless fairy tales, with fantastic mythical creatures, princes and princesses, magic, and just the right touch of silliness.

In “A Woman of Passion: The Life of E. Nesbit, 1858-1924”, Julia Briggs labeled Edith Nesbit Bland as the “first modern writer for children” and credits Nesbit with having invented the children’s adventure story.  Some of her best known stories are The Railway Children, Five Children and It and her Bastable family stories, The Story of the Treasure Seekers and The Wouldbegoods.  Her stories combined realistic children in real-world settings with magical objects and adventure, including travel to fantastical lands.  She has influenced such writers as P.L. Travers (Mary Poppins), Edward Eager (Tales of Magic) and J.K. Rowling and several of her stories have been adapted for film and television.  

Nesbit was a free thinker, a political activist, and co-founder of the Fabian Society.  A young Noel Coward, who was a great admirer of hers, once said she was “the most genuine Bohemian I had ever seen”.

Wikipedia

Synopsis of The Book of Dragons 1-8:

Edith (E.) Nesbit was a master at weaving imagination and real life into timeless fairy tales, with fantastic mythical creatures, princes and princesses, magic, and just the right touch of silliness. This is a collection of nine of her fairy tales with a common theme – Dragons! For children from five to 95, these stories are not to be taken seriously. Let your imagination run wild!

The Book of Beasts – A young king finds a magical book once owned by his great-great-great-great-great-grandfather and unwittingly sets a wicked beast loose in his kingdom. Now he must find a way to best the beast and win back the love of his subjects.

Uncle James – The island kingdom of Rotundia is normal in every way but one – all the animals are the wrong sizes. And when a purple dragon finds its way to the island and desires the princess as a birthday present, young Tom the garderner’s son, along with his lap dog sized elephant Fido, must find a way to save her.

The Deliverers of Their Country – “It all started when Effie got something in her eye…” and before the week was out, the country was overrun with dragons of all sizes. Effie and Harry decide something must be done, so they set out to wake St. George.

The Ice Dragon – Have you ever wanted to travel to the North Pole? See the Aurora Borealis up close and personal? Well, make sure you catch up to George and Jane, two disobedient children, who on December 11th, set out to do just that, finding adventure and a dragon on the way.

The Island of the Nine Whirlpools – When the King and Queen were ready to have a child, the Queen did what all good queens do; she visited the local witch. But she forgot to specify the King wanted a boy child.

The Fiery Dragon – Poor Sabrinetta, granddaughter to brave St. George the dragonslayer, has been banished to her dragon-proof tower while her evil cousin rules her kingdom. But when the dragon wakes, Prince Tiresome runs to the safety of her tower, throwing her out to fend off the dragon by herself. Can she and Elfin the pigkeeper save her people before the dragon has his way with them?

The Dragon Tamers – John the Blacksmith doesn’t know what is at the bottom of the stairs leading down from the dungeon. With any luck, he’ll never find out. But one day when he goes into the dungeon to fetch more coal, he comes face to face with the dragon that has risen from the depths. It looks like today John’s luck may have run out. Or is it just beginning?

Kind Little Edmond – Edmund is not fond of learning but he loves to find out. One day he finds out about the creatures living in the mountain near his village and thinks maybe he doesn’t like finding out about things so much after all. But once the creatures have been found, there is nothing to do but find a way to save the village before it’s too late.

The Last of the Dragons – As tradition holds, on her 16th birthday, the Princess must be tied to a post and left for the dragon. Of course, the Prince has always slain the dragon and saved the Princess. But this Princess is none too confident in the Prince’s ability to save her. She’s much better at her fencing lessons than he. So why can’t the Prince be tied up and saved by the Princess? And, why must the last dragon in England be slain at all?

Audible ~ Amazon

About Narrator Karen Krause:

Karen grew up in a musical family and started singing with her daddy’s band when she was knee-high to a grasshopper, as they say in her native Ozark Mountains.  She’s been performing ever since, playing to anyone who would sit still long enough. When she wasn’t demanding to be the center of attention, she was high in her backyard tree reading just about anything she could get her hands on.  Her love of theatre and the stage grew from school plays and backyard shows to a college degree and regional theatre.  And her love of literature grew as well.  She discovered the world of audiobooks when they really were books on tape and has been an avid fan ever since.  About five years ago, she had an epiphany (why it took her so long is a mystery).  She could combine her love of performing with her love of the spoken word.  She recorded her first audiobook in 2012 and hasn’t looked back.  She just finished her 39th book and it will be released on Audible in June.

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GIVEAWAY!!!

The giveaway is for a 3-month Audible subscription. Open internationally! Ends July 8th, 2017.
The Book of Dragons Giveaway

Escape from the Overworld by Danica Davidson

Narrator: Dan Woren

Publisher: Audible Studios (2015)

Length: 2 hours

Series: Book 1 Overworld Adventures

Author’s Page

Minecraft comes to the real world! Stevie is happily building his treehouse when night begins to settle. Oooopppsss! He’s suppose to be home by now. But he has to fight his way past a creeper then a mob of zombies! Things don’t go smoothly and he feels like the worst mob fighter ever. The next day he spots a portal and he takes his chances, popping out of a computer screen on the other end into Maison’s bedroom. The sixth grader and Stevie quickly become friends, which is a good thing because the monsters of Minecraft have also discovered the portal and the people of Maison’s world are not well-equipped to deal with them!

I’ve never played Minecraft but this book was easy to get into anyway. Stevie is seeking his dad’s approval and is constantly measuring himself against his dad’s great deeds with his diamond sword. This little misadventure into Maison’s world gives him a chance to stand on his own and have great deeds to tell of later.

Maison was fun and bright. She’s keen on building things and wants to be an architect like her mom. While surprised to have Stevie pop out of her computer screen, she’s also very excited to show him her school and perhaps visit his world. Unfortunately, this also means having to deal with the school bullies, Dirk and Mitch. Argh! I wanted to pinch their ears and haul them off to the principle’s office!

Later on, once the zombies and spiders start showing up at the school, the bullies get their comeuppance. Also, Stevie’s wood working skills are greatly appreciated. Maison gets her wish as she and Stevie have to go back to Minecraft to deal with the portal. Together, they and Stevie’s dad come up with a solution that lets them continue their friendship. I really liked how Maison was able to get Stevie’s dad to see how worthy his son is.

All around, it’s a great little family-oriented story. You don’t need to be familiar with the Minecraft game to enjoy it.

I received a free copy of this book.

The Narration: Dan Woren was a great fit for this book. He sounds like a young Stevie and he was great at portraying his emotions. He also made a really good Maison. Then he had adult voices as well for Stevie’s dad and the school shop teacher. His bully voices were spot on as well.

What I Liked: Fun story line; Stevie’s wood working skills; Maison’s enthusiasm for building stuff; how the bullies were dealt with; big spiders!; showing Stevie’s dad that Stevie is worthy; great narration.

What I Disliked: Nothing – it’s a great family-oriented story.

What Others Think: 

The Simply Me Blog

Stories from Herodotus by Lorna Oakes

Narrator: Catherine O’Brien

Publisher: Essential Audiobooks LLC (2017)

Length: 1 hour 43 minutes

Author’s Page

If you’ve ever tried to read Herodotus, then you know that most translations have a lot of repetition and ramble on a bit. Now Lorna Oakes gives us some great stories from Herodotus distilled down into thoughtful, sometimes action-packed, stories that will delight adults and entertain kids.

The book starts off with a little bit about Herodotus. He traveled extensively during his lifetime and wrote down historical events as best he could. Many of the events he wrote about happened generations before his time, so there’s bound to be some inaccuracies. Yet there’s a charm to his works as well. He made a grand attempt at recording the known world’s history and that account has survived to this day. All around, that is extraordinary. I, myself, have only read a bit of Herodotus but Oakes’s book makes it easy to absorb the essence of the tales Herodotus was trying to capture.

There’s 4 parts to this book. Part I is all about King Croesus in Lydia, which is in modern-day Turkey. He has a portentous dream and is concerned about his reign. I really like how he tested the various oracles. Very clever! Yet he then relies on the foretelling of the Delphi Oracle, misinterpreting the true meaning. Oakes does a great job here of just telling this tale, showing us how arrogance can color the meaning to any oracle riddle. It provides a great discussion point for adults and kids alike.

Part II is the Story of Cyrus. Part I flowed into Part II as both Cyrus and King Croesus are both influenced by the Delphi Oracle. This tale tells us how Cyrus came into power. It’s significant because Cyrus united two major families and became a significant Persian ruler. Cyrus was slated for death as a babe but he was saved by a cowherder and his wife. Later, of course, this is discovered and a reckoning must come out of it. I love that Oakes doesn’t leave out a rather bit of gruesome in this story. She doesn’t linger over it either and I feel it was essential to show motivation for one of the character’s vengeance.

Part III is about Herodotus’s time in Egypt. Of course, he visits the great pyramids and writes about how they were constructed. Herodotus gives us his version of how Psammeticus became king of the 26th dynasty of Egypt. This sections also includes the tale of King Apries and how he was overthrown by General Amasis and rebel forces. For me, it was the bits about the Great Pyramids that stood out most in this section.

Part IV is all about the Greeks and Persians. There’s some famous stories in this section, including the tale of Leonidas and how he and his small force repelled Xerxes’s army. This is a captivating story and the retelling of it here is well done. This section also includes the esteemed Greek physician Democedes. He was taken captive and bounced around a bit, sometimes as tribute. He ties Polycrates of Samos to the Persian king Darius.

All around, it’s a great collection of ancient tales based on Herodotus’s works. I love that Oakes has made these tales so accessible and I think this is a great way to introduce kids to ancient history.

I received a free copy of this book via Audiobook Boom!

The Narration: Catherine O’Brien did a great job with this book. There are several people and place names I had not heard pronounced before, so I can’t speak to the accuracy, but I can say she was consistent in her pronunciations all the way through. She was also great with portraying the emotions of the various characters. She sounded engaged and interested in the work all the way through.

What I Liked: Herodotus’s tales made easily accessible; great for kids and adults alike; great narration; lovely cover art; the tale of Leonidas; the Great Pyramids; testing the oracles; Cyrus as a cowherder’s son.

What I Disliked: Nothing – this was a great bit of history and entertainment.

Interview: Miss Mae, Author of the SF Tale Through A Glass Darkly

Everyone, please give a warm welcome to Miss Mae. She’s the author of the Ahoy, Mischaps! series, the deliciously suspenseful science fiction tale Through A Glass Darkly, and the wonderful murder mystery Catch Me If You Can. If you’re interested in the audiobook version of Catch Me If You Can, Miss Mae and her publisher is offering up a serious discount. Go to the book’s page on the Pulp Radio’s webiste, add to your cart, and use this code [DABDARK40] to get a 40% discount for the downloadable version of the audiobook.

1) What mystery in your own life could be a plot for a book?

The mystery of my husband’s illness! That’s nothing like the mysteries I write, I know, but whatever is afflicting him, and we -and the doctor- not knowing the answer, is driving us crazy. That’d have to be a medical kind of mystery book -definitely not what I write- but in a fictional plot, one might could weave that an airborne germ from a too-close asteroid from Mars invaded his bloodstream.

2) If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you choose?

I’ve thought on this since I read your question and I honestly can’t think of one. To me, if a character is evil enough to be labeled as villain, then he doesn’t deserve a happy ending (unless it’s satire, or humor, of course).

3) The public library of your dreams has arrived! What special collections does it hold?

Oh gosh, this is a tough one. Definitely all of Anne Shirley’s ‘Green Gables’ books, plus the DVD’s of the movies (with Megan Follows and Jonathan Crombie); James Herriot’s books; The Hobbit; Phyllis Whitney; Victoria Holt – wow, I could go on and on, but will stop there.

4) If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

A superhero, and his name is Hero Husband to the Rescue! Yes, my hubby is my hero and he wouldn’t hesitate for one iota to risk his own life to save mine.

5) What decade from the last century would you pick to have been a teenager in?

This is funny because I was a teenager in the last century, but I ain’t revealing which decade! LOL

6) What now-dead author would you like to interview? What are some of the things you would chat about?

I’d love to meet James Herriot, along with his partners ‘Siegfried’ and ‘Tristan’. I’d chat with him about his love of animals, and how veterinary medicine has changed since he first joined Siegfried’s practice.

7) What future invention would you like to see not only created during your life time, but readily available to the public?

One that makes hacking computers a complete impossibility!

8) What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

There is a job that stands out, though it wasn’t exactly my ‘worst’ or ‘most difficult’ (though I won’t say ‘challenging’, either, because I know something is shady when I hear someone try to explain a situation as ‘challenging’.) I held a job in an all male maximum- security prison and I managed their inmate accounts. What always, even to this day, struck me as ironic was when we employees parked our cars in the morning and walked up the sidewalk to go inside. We had to pass a guard in the tower and they always called down, “Any weapons?”

If I had a weapon on my person and meant to carry out a criminal intent, am I really going to answer, “Yes.”??????

9) Cover art can be so important for a book, making or breaking sales. How did you get into creating and designing cover art?

As a young girl, art was my first love. You could always catch me with a pencil in hand, trying hard to sketch what my fevered mind imagined. In 9th grade art class, one of my still-life’s was exhibited at a tri-county showing. However, in my later teens, the more books that I read the more I was drawn toward writing my own stories and that rivaled my love of art. With the invention of computers, though, and programs that manipulate stock photos, I can still create and design to my heart’s content – so I now enjoy the best of both passions.

Thank you for having me at your blog, Susan. I’m thrilled to be here! I’ve enjoyed meeting your readers. I’d be happy if anyone is interested in signing up for my monthly newsletter. When they do so, they can download a PDF of my SF novella, “Through a Glass Darkly” given as a gift. Also Dove Island and Fated Destiny…Oh, Yeah? are available as perma-free stories on Amazon!

Miss Mae’s question to my readers: Everybody is health conscious these days, but do you know where your chocolate was grown?

Places to Find Miss Mae

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Book Blurb for Catch Me If You Can

Are all rules broken when it comes to playing a game? Washed ashore a South Carolina beach, Lois Steinberg learns her shelter, an old plantation house, was scheduled to host a “Catch Me” game convention. When the cook is the first one found murdered, the game environment instantly morphs into a terrifying evening reminiscent of And Then There Were None. This audio book has won the Platinum Award in the 2017 Hermes Creative International Competition.

Don’t Forget: Miss Mae and her publisher is offering up a serious discount. Go to the book’s page on the Pulp Radio’s webiste, add to your cart, and use this code [DABDARK40] to get a 40% discount for the downloadable version of the audiobook.

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Author Bio: 

Miss Mae is all about romantic mysteries. With her writing style compared to the likes of Agatha Christie, her books “Said the Spider to the Fly”, “When the Bough Breaks”, “Dove Island”, “It’s Elementary, My Dear Winifred” and “See No Evil, My Pretty Lady” are award winning best sellers. The novellas “Miss Penelope’s Letters”, and “Through a Glass Darkly” have received top rated five-star reviews. Her latest murder mystery, “Catch Me If You Can”, in audio format, has won the platinum award in the 2017 Hermes Creative International Competition. Tantalizing trailers, and more information, is readily available at her website.

She’s also penned three tales in the ‘Ahoy, Mischaps!’ children’s/humor series. Book #1 is “Ahoy, Gum Drop!” followed by Book #2 “Ahoy, Out There!” with Book #3, “Ahoy, Mummy Mia!” In these slightly cracked stories, readers are introduced to a cast of intriguing, extraordinary and downright bizarre characters, accompanied by the one and only I.B. Nosey, the ‘official unofficial’ reporter. To learn more about the ‘Mischaps’ and cyberspace’s only Pukelitzer Award winning interviewer, visit ‘Feeling Nosey?’

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Narrator: Andrea Emmes

Publisher: Listen2aBook.com (2016)

Length: 17 hours 36 minutes

Series: Book 1 Little Women

Author’s Page

This American classic, set in the 19th century during the Civil War, follows the lives of the March sisters as they grow up and become young ladies. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy are often joined by their neighbor Laurie, who is living with his grandfather.

Some how I missed reading this book as a kid but as an adult, I have had the pleasure to read it twice, this being the second time. Jo is still my favorite character. I love how she often flies in the face of what society might expect from a proper young lady. At one point she cuts off a good chunk of her hair. She learns to writes short stories that sell to newspapers, so she has a source of independent income. She’s not caught up in the latest dance or the stylish lace. Yep. She’s much how I would imagine myself if I was trapped in the 1800s.

The other sisters all have their own personalities as well. Meg is the oldest and seems be a little mother in waiting. Once she falls in love, that’s exactly what she becomes – a dotting mom. Then sweet Beth embodies the tender heart of the family. She is so kind to everyone and everyone in turn is so gentle and kind with her. Amy has a flash of independence as well but she’s also rather caught up in appearances. While the Marches don’t have much money, Amy makes up for it in grace and practical kindness.

Laurie is a good addition to the mix. I really like his grandfather as well. Laurie starts off as a rather shy and lonely lad but the girls draw him out pretty quickly and adopt him into their little circle of confidences and games. Marmee (Mrs. March) does her best to be a confidant to her daughters while also allowing them the privacy they need. Robert March, the dad, is seen quite a bit less in the book though he’s totally doted on by the family when he is home.

The entire book is riddled with little life lessons. For the first 3/4 of the book, these are well portrayed in story form. The author shows us rather than tells us. For instance, I like how Marmee often gives her girls enough rope to hang themselves. She lets them make mistakes so that they will recall the lesson better in the future. The solitary thing I don’t care for is that the last bit of this book gets a bit preachy. I feel the author was either rushed or got a little tired of the book herself and started telling us the lessons instead of showing us. Plus, perhaps since a main character dies, religion is brought into the mix. Despite this minor let down for the ending of the book, I still really enjoy this classic.

Let’s talk limes. Yes, limes. There’s a great little bit of the book that goes on about these pickled limes that were all the rage at school. In fact, the teacher banned them from his classroom since they were a distraction. One of the sisters had to borrow money from another sister just so she could buy some limes. After reading that section, I really want to try a pickled lime.

One of the reasons I so like this book is that most of the characters are women and it’s not a big romance. There is romance here and there, but that isn’t the main driving force of the plot. Women have so many more freedoms and rights now than they did during the Civil War and yet here we have a well written and enjoyable book that has women actually doing things, instead of being these flowery, vague love interests. So, when someone gives me the excuse, ‘Oh, things were different back then,’ to explain why a book is lacking in relevant female characters, I can always point to Alcott and quirk an eyebrow. Yes, things were different back then, but women were still relevant. Thank you Ms. Alcott!

I received a free copy of this book via The Audiobookworm.

The Narration: Andrea Emmes did such a lovely job with this book. She made each sister sound unique and she also managed to make them sound young when they are little girls and like young ladies by the end of the book. She also had a variety of male voices which were quite believable. 

What I Liked: Great narration; a worthy classic; ladies doing stuff but still working within the confines of the times; a family that does have arguments but still love each other; Laurie being brought into the fold; the pickled limes!

What I Disliked: It does get a tad preachy towards the end.

Check out more reviews, interviews, spotlights, and more on the blog tour.

About Andrea Emmes:

Andrea Emmes started her career performing in musical theater while growing up on the East Coast. This lead to a successful career as a stage performer working for Walt Disney World, Universal Studios, Renaissance Cruises and eventually head lining on the Las Vegas Strip.  Having worked in tv, film and video games, Andrea, a total bibliophile, now enjoys narrating audiobooks at her home studio in San Jose, California.  Known as “The Girl with a Thousand Voices”, her wide range of character voices and dynamic/emotionally invested performances has reviewers and listeners alike commenting on how she effortlessly pulls listeners in, and has versatility and charisma. Not only does she have a Bachelor of Science in Game Art and Design, but Andrea gets her inner gamer geek on playing games of all kinds with her husband and their cat, Lucy.

 Website ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Instagram

Synopsis of Little Women:

 

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, set in the 19th century follows the lives of four sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March as they live, learn, love, and grow as young pilgrims and blossom into fine little women.
Based on the author’s childhood, Little Women is one of the most beloved stories in American literature. It continues to touch listeners both young and old. Alcott takes you on a prolific journey which will make your heart swell, your soul laugh, and your heart ache as we experience the lives of the March sisters as they endure their lessons, scrapes, castles in the air, their romances, and more.

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About the Author Louisa May Alcott:

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist and poet best known as the author of the novel Little Women (1868) and its sequels Little Men (1871) and Jo’s Boys (1886). Raised by her transcendentalist parents, Abigail May and Amos Bronson Alcott in New England, she also grew up among many of the well-known intellectuals of the day such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau.

Read more about her on Wikipedia!

The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill

BarnhillTheGirlWhoDrankTheMoonHeldigClaudieNarrator: Christina Moore

Publisher: Recorded Books (2016)

Length: 9 hours 37 minutes

Author’s Page

In this beautifully magical book, the witch Xan adopts a sacrificial baby from the Protectorate into her heart, having accidentally fed her the moonlight. As baby Luna grows, so does her magic yet she is unable to control it. Soon she unknowingly becomes a hazard to her adoptive family, turning Glerk into a fuzzy mammal. Xan fears tiny dragon Fyrian may be next, so she bottles up Luna’s magic until she is older and can control it. Meanwhile, sorrow hangs heavy over the Protectorate as the Tower and the Elders demand the yearly sacrifice to the ‘witch’ to keep their town safe. Meanwhile, young Antain has grown into a young man and over the course of the book he becomes determined to stop the ‘witch’ from stealing any more of their children.

Wow! Just, simply, wow! I fell in love hard with this book. I do enjoy a fun kid’s book here and there but this hit all the right buttons for me. It has this wonderful mix of magic, sorrow, adventure, loss, love, discovery, humor, and goodbyes. Barnhill has magnificently caught the sorrow of losing a child and also a child’s longing to know their biological parents in this intense fairy tale. Those two things give what would otherwise be a light, fun read a certain keen edge that makes all the beautiful parts that much more intense.

The Protectorate is surrounded by a bog and a forest and few of the residents know of any life outside the area. It is ruled by two powers – the Council and Elders (a group of ‘wise’ old men) and the Tower (which is filled with armed, armored, and well-educated women). Right away, we are privy to a yearly scene where a child is taken from its family and walked to edge of the town and left for the evil ‘witch’ to retrieve. The townsfolk are told this is to keep the entire town from being decimated by the witch, but the Elders all know there is no witch. The ritual keeps them in power and comfort. Young Antain, who is being groomed to become an Elder, sees first hand the horrible result of this as the baby’s mother goes insane with grief and is locked in the Tower for safekeeping.

Xan has known for years that the Protectorate gives up a child on the same day every year so she has been visiting them in secret and taking the babies off to other cities to be adopted into willing families. Yet this time it is different. Xan calls down the starlight to feed the baby, but she is extra hungry, and before Xan knows it, she has accidentally fed the babe moonlight, enmagicing her. Xan decides to adopt her, names her Luna, and becomes her Grandmother. Glerk, an ancient, friendly bog monster, and Fyrian, a tiny baby dragon, round out the family.

Xan is the real star of this book. She gives so much and becomes a bit of a willing sacrifice herself. Her decisions drive much of the plot. Plus I just enjoy her character. She’s got a bit of a hidden history that becomes clearer towards the end of the book. Luna is fun but she doesn’t have much of a personality until the last quarter of the book. I was also quite taken with Antain. His story arc is the most dynamic, starting off as a young lad, being groomed as an Elder, studying in the Tower, suffering a scarring accident, and eventually resolving to put an end to the yearly sacrifices. I think Antain deserves a story of his own. Fyrian and Glerk provide the comedic relief much of the time but add so much love and happiness to the tale I would be shallow to dismiss them. Glerk, being as ancient as he is, knows the importance of family and the ties of love and friendship. Fyrian is not as young as he thinks he is but he’ll grow into it.

There is a hidden villain in the story and I didn’t figure out their identity until the last third of the book. I loved that I was totally not expecting it and therefore, I didn’t really know where this tale would take me. I loved that I couldn’t easily predict how things would turn out. The story has just enough hard edges, just enough evil and sorrow, that the author had me wondering if this fairy tale would indeed have a happy ending. Luna’s mom really captures the heart of this novel. Her immense love for her lost baby has driven her into a deep sorrow and that sorrow has pushed her into a touch of insanity and that touch has opened the door of magic just a crack. All these elements are connected in one person here and the bigger story shows how those elements connect all the people in this tale to one another. It’s really quite clever. Like up there with Neil Gaiman kind of clever.

In short, I can’t recommend this book enough. I was captured from the opening scene and didn’t want to put it down. I was never quite sure how things would end and this kept me thoroughly invested in the story and characters.

I received a free copy of this book.

The Narration: Christian Moore did a great job with this book. I loved her voice for Xan, Glerk, and Fyrian. She also managed quite well in portraying not only a young Antain but also the man he grew into over the course of the book. Her voice for the true villain could be quite spooky indeed! She was excellent at imbuing scenes with the correct, and sometimes subtle, emotions. 

What I Liked: Beauty and sorrow mixed together; and intense fairy tale; enchanting characters; clever villain; ties of family, friendship, and love; Antain’s quest; Luna’s coming of age; Xan’s sacrifice; Glerk and Fyrian; excellent narration; beautiful cover art. 

What I Disliked: Nothing! A completely enchanting tale.

What Others Think:

Nerdy Book Club

Geeks of Doom

The Winged Pen

Reading to Know

Carina’s Books

Audiobook & Signed Book Giveaway + Interview: Brandon Bosse, Author of the Phillip Aisling Adventures

BosseTheDreamsOfPhillipAislingAndTheNuminousNawaaganEveryone, please give a warm welcome to author Brandon Bosse. Don’t miss the GIVEAWAY at the end of this post – signed paper copies and Audible.com/.UK copies of The Dreams of Phillip Aisling and the Numinous Nagwaagan. 

What’s next for Phillip Aisling?

Well that could be answered a few different ways. First, and what I’m most excited about, I am working with a team of talented UCSD students to create a virtual reality game called Phillip’s Lucid Dream Training.  It is based on the first and second books, so it will actually be a bit of a preview of book #2. In the game, the player takes on the role of Phillip, a young true Dreamer just getting started learning how to master his dreams with lucid dreaming. Lucid dreaming and virtual reality go hand in hand because both transport you to a world that looks incredibly real, but you are aware that it isn’t real! A demo version will be coming out later this year for Google Daydream and a full version for HTC Vive later.

Next, the second book is underway titled The Dreams of Phillip Aisling and the Lessons of Lucidity.  In this book, Phillip begins training by the Dream Masters to learn how to fully take control of his dreams. I have taken your comments to heart that the story needs something more to draw the reader in, so expect the story to take an epic turn in book #2. I have tons of notes that I’ve been collecting as I’ve been doing research for the book over the years. I cannot wait to get them down into a book. It is just so hard to find the time to write between all the other projects I have going on!

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

If I had to choose? Oh but why choose?! Why not be rescued by a supernatural alien who happens to be my own personal superhero?! Since my book is about interdimensional travelling via lucid dreams, I am imagining a being that has developed the ability to open portals to any point in time and space, which would be quite supernatural indeed. I imagine that this being would rescue me just as my eyes close as I prepare to accept my unfortunate fate and my spirit transitions back into the astral. By some unexplainable supernatural force I’m swiftly yanked back to reality by the interdimensional alien, pulled to safety within the hyperspace of infinite possibility. Or I suppose I could have just gone with a superhero. Superman. Yes, let’s go with Superman. He will do nicely. Come to think of it, he is a supernatural alien superhero!

If you could, what book or movie or TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

My favorite movie of all time, The Matrix. I recently re-watched it again for the umpteenth time, but this time with a friend who had never seen the movie before. It brought back many fond memories of what it was like to watch it for the first time.

[SPOILER ALERT] Go watch the movie if you haven’t already! Come back and read the rest afterward!

There is a scene near the beginning where Neo is offered a deal by Agent Smith to “wipe the slate clean” in exchange for helping track down Morpheus, but Neo instead gives him the finger and demands his right to a phone call. Agent Smith responds, “What good is a phone call if you cannot speak?” and Neo’s mouth begins to seal shut as the lips inexplicably begin to grow together! When I first saw this movie I was really taken aback by this scene, as was my friend watching it with me for the first time. This is the first point in the movie where you realize some something really serious is up. It’s moments like that in the movie and many other ah-ha moments that make me want to relive it all over again for the first time.

What makes you fall in love with a story?

I love a story that has a misunderstood, goodhearted protagonist that has supernatural abilities. Remember the 1995 movie Powder? It featured a misunderstood albino boy who had telepathy and telekinesis and was taunted relentlessly by ignorant boys and eventually died by converting back into pure energy. I loved that movie and was very moved by it. I also loved Matilda. Her parents didn’t get her at all, but her teacher helped her realize the potential of her telekinetic gifts! Now that was a fun movie!

If you were sent on a magical quest which other 4 fantasy authors would you take with you?

In no particular order, I would select the following 4 fantasy authors to join me on a magical quest:

J.R.R. Tolkien – because he practically invented the modern genre of magical quests! Although, he is a bit long-winded at times, which might get annoying after a presumed weeks long journey together, his ability to imagine fantasy worlds would no doubt prove more than useful.

Brandon Sanderson – First of all, Brandon has a cool name! Haha! He has impressed me many times with his prose in The Way of Kings and is a big inspiration for me as I set off on writing book #2 in my Phillip Aisling series. The fact that he’s roughly my age helps, too!

J.K. Rowling – Speaking of inspiration, Harry Potter was absolutely a huge influence on my book! Ms. Rowling’s knowledge of magical systems would be essential to solving any puzzles along the way.

Terry Pratchett – He seems like a happy-go-lucky, lighthearted fellow. His ability to imagine worlds rivals those of Tolkien and Lewis Carroll. I’d invite him just to add some much needed levity to the bunch!

Who or what are your non-writer influences?

I would definitely say that Rob Bryanton’s video, Imagining the 10th Dimension, was the most influential source I drew from when forming the ideas for dream magic in the book. It was in 2007 when I awoke from an unusually vivid dream and I had been watching YouTube videos about higher dimensions. I came to the realization that given the infinite probability space that exists in the theorized multidimensional hyperspace, then dreams are then glimpses into alternate positions therein. Now take that concept, and write a young adult novel about it. There’s 99% of the inspiration for The Dreams of Phillip Aisling.

What reboots (or retellings) of classics have you enjoyed? Are there ones that haven’t worked for you?

I remember watching The Incredible Hulk as a kid and liking it, but the new movies are, well, incredible! There’s just something about how realistic CGI can make the Hulk that a body-builder with green body paint and purple spandex just doesn’t live up to, you know? Plus, the story line, dialog, and acting are more on par with what we’ve come to expect with modern movie production. As for reboots that I haven’t gotten into, sticking to the superheroes, I’d say that I really wanted to like The Flash reboot, but just couldn’t get into it. Perhaps it’s because I don’t have a lot of time to watch TV these days and so I’m very selective with what I’ll give my attention.

Cover art can be so important for a book, making or breaking sales. Will you tell us a bit about your book’s cover art?

I absolutely agree! A mistake some indie authors make is putting their heart and soul into their writing but then scrimp on the book cover. While I still agree that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, you still need a cover that grabs the attention and imagination of potential new readers. The cover is the first impression that either leads someone to invest their time into reading your book or not. My book’s cover was illustrated by the very talented Andres Cortes. If you want your best chance of getting a book cover you’ll absolutely love then I recommend you do what I did. Here is a blog article that gives away my secret to getting the perfect book cover.

As for how I came up with the scene for the cover, I knew it needed to capture the more important moment of the namesake of the book, ‘The Numinous Nagwaaagan’. In the depicted scene, Phillip is receiving his prized possession from the Oracle, an old Native American woman who’s dreams have shown her all she ever wanted to know of the future.

What is the first book you remember reading on your own?

Well other than picture books from early childhood, like the Berenstain Bears, the first full length novel that I recall reading was The Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. It made me want to learn more about wilderness survival. I loved it!

You have to run an obstacle course. Who do you invite along (living or dead, real or fictional)?

Nightcrawler from X-Men would be a great partner for any obstacle course! He has always been my favorite of the X-Men because his teleportation ability is awesome and he is always so compassionate. Of course having him with me would almost be like cheating considering he could simply teleport us both past any obstacle, but you did say I could invite any fictional character of my choice!

Thank you Susan for these fun questions! They certainly lead me down a few unexpected paths that have even contributed to ideas for my book series!

Book Blurb for The Dreams of Phillip Aisling and the Numinous Nagwaagan

BosseTheDreamsOfPhillipAislingAndTheNuminousNawaaganPhillip Aisling is just like any other boy, or so he thought. On the night of his 13th birthday he has a dream so vivid that he is convinced it was real! He soon learns that he has begun training with the Dream Masters. They practice lucid dreaming to be able to fully control their dreams, giving them immense power. But when his vivid dreams turn into nightmares he never wants to fall asleep again!

In his struggle to understand his remarkable dreams and prevent terrible nightmares, he finds The Dreamer’s Dictionary written to help young Dreamers make sense of their new powers. It begins with a very peculiar poem:

“Through the Gates of Dreaming come powers untold.

There are distant worlds for true Dreamers to behold.

You may not understand just what your dreams mean

Once you have broken through the barrier in between.

Each moment you sleep brings signs without number.

May this book bring meaning to visions of your slumber.”

The dictionary leads him to seek the guidance of the Oracle who gives him a numinous nagwaagan, or a magical dreamcatcher, to protect him from the draiths that are causing the nightmares. With the protection of the nagwaagan hanging above his bed, he is finally able to safely return to dreamland. But his struggle to learn to control his new powers has only just begun!

Join Phillip and his friends on an epic journey to learn how to become a powerful Dreamer. Explore the possibilities of where our dreams might come from. Are our dreams nothing more than glimpses into alternate realities within the multiverse?

Have you had a dream so vivid that you are certain it was real? Would you like to control your dreams? Maybe you too are a true Dreamer!

About Brandon Bosse

BrandonBosseAuthorBrandon Bosse is a computational cognitive neuroscientist, biomedical engineer, and visiting scholar at UCSD. He has worked in the field of retinal implants for the past 10 years, including prior work in Germany and Australia. During this time he wrote The Dreams of Phillip Aisling. He was inspired to begin writing the story after awakening from an unusually vivid dream in 2007. He is a Lucid Dreaming and Virtual Reality enthusiast and is also working on a VR Game called Phillip Aisling’s Lucid Dreams, where the player can learn lucid dreaming techniques while exploring Phillip’s dreamland.
Follow Brandon at facebook, twitter, and instagram to get regular updates about the VR project, the newly released audiobook, and the next book in the series!

Places to Find Brandon Bosse

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

GoodReads

Amazon

Audible

GIVEAWAY!

Brandon Bosse is generously offering up 2 signed copies of the paperback and 2 copies of the Audible audiobook (winners choose Audible.com or Audible.UK) of The Dreams of Phillip Aisling and the Numinous Nagwaagan. You can enter the Rafflecopter below or you can answer these questions in the comments: 1) Are you interested in the signed book or the audiobook? 2) What reboots have you enjoyed? 3) Please leave a way to contact you if you win. Giveaways ends March 1, 2017, midnight. Additionally, if you are interested in receiving a free copy of the book (including audiobook copies) in exchange for an honest review, you can contact Brandon through any of his social media.

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Teddy Bears and the Christmas Pirates by Justin Sloan

SloanTeddyBearsAndTheChristmasPiratesNarrator: Michael Gilliland

Publisher: Justin Sloan (2016)

Length: 1 hour 26 minutes

Series: Book 3 Teddy Defenders

Author’s Page

Note: Even though this is Book 3 in the series, it works fine as a stand alone.

Teddy bears Ari and Mia are in for quite the adventure in this story! It’s Christmas time and these bears are a little worried about being replaced. Their fears aren’t to be taken lightly. However, no one expected Grizzly pirates! They came and stole the new bears and now Ari and Mia feel compelled to mount a rescue mission. They must be back before Christmas morning for their kids Rick and Tiffany. So right there we have the makings of a great little adventure – danger, the unknown, and a time limit for true success.

The Teddy Defenders (which is primarily Ari, Mia, and Brutas) come up with a plan to track down the pirates and find out what they’re up to with captured bears. Turns out Captain Crab wants to conquer the world! Muuuhhhhahahahaa! Captain Crab might be reaching a little too high, but that doesn’t mean we should let him give it a good try. The Teddy Defenders have to figure out who they can trust and who might be swayed to side with them.

Captain Crab is after a treasure that will give the Grizzly pirates great power – the Treasure of Cardoz! There’s plenty of swashbuckling and humorous Grizzly pirate swearing (all G rated). The Teddy Defenders feel they must find this treasure first and keep it from the Grizzly pirates. As things unfold, a plot is hatched. There’s honey involved.

Over all, it was a very amusing story. I do believe it is my favorite so far in the series. I loved all the pirate outfits on the Grizzlies and the standoffs and the pirate swearing and the race to find and capture the treasure. As with the previous books, the ending was quite cute and totally fit the story.

I received a free copy of this book.

The Narration: Michael Gilliland continues to be a great pick for this series. I really, really enjoyed his Grizzly pirate voices in this book. He also does a great job with the few female voices, especially Mia. There’s a few sound effects tossed in here and there and I really liked that too – they added to the story and didn’t distract from it.

What I Liked: Grizzly pirates! great book cover; good use of honey; pirate singing; G-rated pirate cursing; the treasure hunt; great narration.

What I Disliked: Nothing – I thoroughly enjoyed this story.

Interview: Danica Davidson, Author of Battle with the Wither, an Unofficial Overworld Adventure

DavidsonBattleWithTheWitherEveryone, please give a warm welcome to author Danica Davidson. We chat about manga, cyberbullying, Minecraft, and plenty more! She’s previously been interviewed on one of my favorite book blogs, The Little Red Reviewer. Make sure to check that out for even more about Danica. Now, on to the interview!

Is there a genre or literary niche that you feel hasn’t gotten its deserved amount of attention?

I think things tend to move in waves, and as you notice certain sales dominating publishing, then it’s all about that kind of book. It changes every so often, but there are usually a few types of books that garner the most attention, and others that fall to the wayside. Personally speaking, it can sometimes be very difficult to pitch my Minecrafter books for reviews or interviews, because there can be a stigma about kids’ adventure books. People assume adventure books can’t have much depth. But I write books that have lots of cliffhangers (to keep kids excited) and talk about real issues at the same time, like cyberbullying. It’s important for me that these books are fun and also have deeper meaning.

DavidsonMangaArtForBeginnersIf you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

I think I’d have to go with superhero. Then again, what kind of supernatural creature?

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

The Simpsons. It’s been my favorite show since I was seven, and I like to joke I learned half my vocabulary from it. (In fourth grade I used to walk around and use the word “perspicacity” because I heard it from Lisa.) As an adult, I realize how well the show is written for both kids and adults, and tons of jokes went over my head back then. I think it’d be amazing to watch all over and not know what to expect, because so many jokes would catch me off-guard.

DavidsonPuppyPartyHow does modern pop culture influence your work? Do modern cultural references date a piece or add touchstones for the reader?

It depends on what I’m writing. For my manga book, Manga Art for Beginners, it goes into how to draw popular manga character types, like ninja or butlers. With my Barbie comic Barbie: Puppy Party, Barbie and her sisters put on an adoption event for the local shelter, so it’s not pop culture there, but it’s a reference to reality and animal welfare.

For the Minecrafter books, I talk a lot about Minecraft and tech, so that puts it very much in the now, but that’s also the point of these books. I also talk about cyberbullying in the books, which is sort of a “now” thing, but treating people badly is still treating people badly, and that’s not going to go away. Tech just allows us new, anonymous, farther-reaching ways to harass people. I hope these books can help kids be able to talk about cyberbullying, how it affects them, and how we can all be good online citizens.

I also take on cyberbullying in a short comic I wrote called “Picture Perfect,” which will be in Tales from the Crypt from Papercutz in 2017. It’s much darker than the cyberbullying in the Minecrafter books.

If you were sent on a quest which other manga authors would you take with you?

Is this for survival or for fun? For survival, I’d have to check out their skills. If it’s for fun, then I’ll just get distracted by their great art and probably get nothing accomplished. I’d bring along a lot of bishonen artists who’d probably get tired of me asking them to draw all sorts of things for me.

DavidsonEscapeFromTheOverworldAre there any manga characters you would like to cosplay or have cosplayed?

I don’t generally cosplay myself, though I love seeing what people come up with. I’m more into “becoming” new characters by writing about them as opposed to dressing up like them.

If you could sit down and have tea (or a beer) with 5 fictional characters, who would you invite to the table?

Lisa Simpson from The Simpsons, Kazutaka Muraki from Descendants of Darkness, the Phantom from The Phantom of the Opera, Raven from DC Comics and Stevie from my books.

Care to share an awkward fangirl/fanboy moment, either one where someone was gushing over your work…..or one where you were gushing over another author’s work?

I probably sounded like an idiot when I got to meet Tamora Pierce at the ALA convention. I was telling her I started reading her books when I was in middle school and I loved them so much and I was writing for MTV right then (I showed her my badge so I’d try to look professional) and maybe I could interview her for there and lots of incoherent (another Lisa Simpson taught word) chatter. But she was very nice.

Places to Find Danica Davidson

Website

Twitter

Goodreads

Amazon

Author Bio: 

AuthorDanicaDavidsonDanica Davidson is the author of the Minecrafter novels Escape from the Overworld, Attack on the Overworld, The Rise of Herobrine, Down Into the Nether, The Armies of Herobrine, and Battle with the Wither; the how-to-draw manga book Manga Art For Beginners; and the comic book Barbie: Puppy Party. Her books have been called “EXCITING” by Forbes, “RECOMMENDED READING” by School Library Journal, and have been spotlighted by Sci Fi Magazine, Barnes & Noble Kids Blog, MTV and other publications. She was also one of a small group of writers to receive a Webby honor at MTV for Best Youth Writing.

Book Blurb for Battle with the Wither

DavidsonBattleWithTheWitherAfter finally defeating Herobrine and rescuing his father, Stevie is looking forward to putting the prophecy far behind him. Bidding his friends farewell, Stevie returns to the Overworld to make up for lost time with his dad.

But their reunion is cut short when a Wither attacks the Overworld, destroying their house. When Stevie rushes outside to survey the damage, he can’t believe his eyes; they’re surrounded by deadly ghasts, blazes, and zombie pigmen from the Nether! Somehow, Herobrine has found a way to retaliate from beyond the grave—and now the entire Overworld must face his vengeance.

In the exciting conclusion to the Unofficial Overworld Adventure series, it’s up to Stevie, his dad, and their friends to restore balance between the Overworld and the Nether, defeat the Wither, and—most importantly of all—protect each other.

In particular, this adventure series is created especially for readers who love the fight of good vs. evil, magical academies like Hogwarts in the Harry Potter saga, and games like Minecraft, Terraria, and Pokemon GO.

Book Giveaway & Review: David Travels to the Past by Gonzalo Martínez De Antoñana

DeAntonanaDavidTravelsToThePast

Don’t forget to check out the giveaway at the bottom of the post!

Illustrator: María José Mosquera

Publisher: Saure Publisher (2016)

Length: 74 pages

Author’s Page

Note: This book contains two distinct adventures: The Rock Painters, Art of the Upper Paleolithic Period and also The Babylonians, Art of Mesopotamia. Each story starts with a little introduction page. David is an apprentice artist to Master Messina and Angela joins in the second adventure. While there are a few typos, perhaps due to translation errors perhaps, in the first story, there are more in the second, including a few lines that are rather clunky. Please note that my copy was an ARC and these typos and translation errors may be corrected in the final publication. They did not detract from my enjoyment of the book.

In the first tale, The Rock Painters, Art of the Upper Paleolithic Period, Messina uses hypnosis to transport both himself and David into the distant past – the Paleolithic period. There, they befriend a small group of nomadic hunters and they then spend weeks with them learning about their various types of art. Po-pec and Ae-tel are the most prominent characters among the the tribe. They act as guides for David and Messina in exploring caves and learning how to do their art.

What I really loved about this story is that the author didn’t shy away from using big words, which were then usually explained by Messina or by the context of the images the words related to. Also, the story shows several different types of art, such as portable art (images carved on small bone pieces), narrative art (art that tells a story), clay modeling, bas-reliefs, and others. The story also goes into some of the techniques used in making the art.

In between the bits of art lesson, David and Messina are on an adventure. There’s animal hunts, dancing, mudslides, and more. Not only do our heroes get to examine the prehistoric art up close, they get to live the life for several weeks, giving them a deeper appreciation of the art. My little criticism for this story is that while there are a few females depicted in the tale, none of them get names, get any lines, and aren’t a significant part of the story.

In the second story, The Babylonians, Art of Mesopotamia, David and Messina use the same method to be transported back to around 600 BC in the city of Babylon. Angela, Messina’s niece, was also transported with them and she’s just as ready as David for an adventure. They start their hunt for the origins of Mesopotamian art. They see several famous buildings, such as the Ishtar Gate and the Babylonian gardens. It’s not just architecture they investigate, but also the decorative friezes and and the glass bricks with relief patterns.

Still they hunt for the origins of this fine art. With the aid of the god Marduk, they are transported even further back to 645 BC at the Ninive library. At this point in the story, somehow they are able to understand the Niniveans and vice versa. In the first story, such linguistic abilities were not possible. However, they are unable to understand the written cuneiform. While I found this odd, it wasn’t a major point in the story. Besides, I was having too much fun with this ancient history adventure. There’s the ruler Assurbanipal and the mythological hero Gilgamesh to meet! There’s wall paintings and sculptures to enjoy!

The next leg of the journey has them even further back in time, in the second millennium BC, where they meet Hammurabi. Here, I was pleased to see the diorite sculptures. Finally, Marduk transports them to the third millennium BC, in the city of Uruk of the Sumerian civilization. Here they meet the high priestess of the goddess Innana. Finally, they discover the origins of the Mesopotamian art. Indeed, I found it very clever to walk back in time and see how architecture and art grew from these earliest Sumerian works. I enjoyed this second adventure more than the first, partially because it wasn’t just an art adventure, but also architecture and history. Also, this story had three female characters (though only two have names) that each had lines and roles in the story.

Illustration: I really enjoyed the illustrations for this graphic novel. In the first adventure, The Rock Painters, Art of the Upper Paleolithic Period, I especially liked that Mosquera has this distinct style for the story, but then also uses a different style to depict the Paleolithic art. Her depictions of the cave art is immediately identifiable as such. As with the first story, The Babylonians, Art of Mesopotamia has the distinct style for all the characters and background, but then totally different styles to depict the various art. I like that Mosquera rendered true-to-life depictions of the various art, which added to my delight in the book.

What I Liked: Adventures in art and history!; great illustration!; David and Messina appreciate the art more with each adventure; Angela joins in for the second adventure; the Mesopotamian gods and rulers; how David and Angela mimic the art they’ve learned about.

What I Disliked: The first adventure was all about the men.

Be sure to check out other reviews on the book tour via iRead Book Tours!

Buy the Book

USA: Amazon  ~  Kindle ~  Barnes & Noble

UK: Amazon  ~ Kindle

Australia: Fishpond  ~  Booktopia ~ Kindle

Author and Illustrator

María José is a teacher. She won international illustrations awards.

Gonzalo has a degree in art history. He works in museums and as a tourist guide.

Connect with them: Website  ~  Twitter  ~  Facebook ~ Pinterest

GIVEAWAY!!!

Win a print copy of the graphic novel David Travels to the Past (open int’l / 5 winners)

Ends Dec 10

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