Giveaway & Interview: Bijhan Valibeigi, Author of The Beginning of a Bizarre Friendship

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ValibeigiBeginningOfABizarreFriendshipEveryone, please welcome Bijhan Valibeigi to the blog today! She’s here to chat about RPGs, Power Rangers, Steven Saylor books, and plenty more!  If you want to find out about the GIVEAWAY, then scroll to the bottom. You can also check out my review of her book, The Beginning of a Bizarre Friendship, which I quite enjoyed.

If you could be an extra on a SFF movie or TV show, what would it be?

My first instinct would be to say one of the upcoming Star Trek films, in no small part because I would look excellent in one of those red skirted uniforms, but when I think about the set on which I’d probably have the most fun, it would probably have to be Power Rangers.

If you had to choose someone to rescue you from the jaws of certain death would it be a superhero, supernatural creature, or a space alien?

Again, the answer comes back to Power Rangers. Who wouldn’t want to be swept up into the arms of those beautiful heroes? If footage existed of me being saved by the Power Rangers, I would watch it every morning with my breakfast.

If you could, what book/movie/TV series would you like to experience for the first time all over again and why?

Parks and Recreation. Every once in a while, I remember that there will never be another new episode, and my heart breaks a little. The answer would be 30 Rock, but now that The Muppets is on the air, that void has been filled.

What has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

There’s something especially grueling about working a job with a lot of down time and a lot of physical labor, like the work I did as a grocery clerk. Most people would assume that the strenuous labor would be the worst part, and it is not pleasant, but the real pain came from the need to turn my brain off. I cannot turn my brain off. That’s why I write, design games, compose music, and paint: My brain is constantly overflowing, and not having anywhere for my ideas to go is a special kind of pain.

More and more we see fiction being multimedia – a book, a TV show, a PC game, a graphic novel. How do you see the publishing industry evolving to handle this trend? Any plans to take your works in the multimedia realm?

Star Trek was a pioneer in this field in the 1970s. Selling Spock shirts and Captain Kirk action figures was big money, so they began licensing for other products, including wonderful novels, comic books, and tabletop games which expanded the context of the Star Trek universe. This effort was decentralized, however, and therefore often contradictory and incompatible. George Lucas stepped up the multimedia game with Star Wars, which enhanced the core movies with novels, comics, television, and genuinely high-quality games of both the electronic and tabletop variety. Realizing the power of unified branding and cross-platform storytelling, Marvel and DC followed Star Wars’ lead. Unfortunately, Star Trek never made the leap to a wholly unified universe.

The Time Wars universe is one of my own creation, a vast series of interconnected timelines, sewing together the fates of Humanity, Vampires, aliens, spies, soldiers, heroes, and every people. In the tabletop RPG I designed, Time Wars: Strike Team [link: timewarsuniverse.com/StrikeTeam.html], which is available as a free downloadable PDF, players can take on the roles of superhuman time travelers who battle vampiric enemies from the Stone Age to the Galactic Age. I’ve also created a strategy card game, the world’s first deck-stacking game, Time Wars: Supreme Command [link: timewarsuniverse.com/SupremeCommand.html], where players use cards to assemble their Time Travelers, and duel for control over the Timeline as they set their own goals and foil the goals of their opponents. There are cards in the game which represent characters from not only The Beginning of a Bizarre Friendship [link: timewarsuniverse.com/Books.html], the first novel in the Time Wars Tales fiction brand, but also the ongoing flash fiction series Time Wars Tales: Legends of the Order  [link:timewarsuniverse.wordpress.com]. The events of Legends of the Order provide a deeper context for the events of The Beginning of a Bizarre Friendship, although both can be thoroughly enjoyed on their own.

My ideas have always transcended any one form of media. I can’t help but write music for the characters I create, develop stories for the games I design, and weave together my various stories into a larger narrative. In fact, one of the first games I ever designed came from sheer excitement at just having read the first Harry Potter novel, at which point I promptly invented a board game where players became students at Hogwarts. Perhaps it’s from consuming so much Star Trek and Star Wars as a youngster. It’s certainly enough for me to name my series Time Wars as an homage.

If you’d like to support the strategy card game, we will be having a Kickstarter for Time Wars: Supreme Command starting March 27th, and you can follow @TimeWarsRPG on Twitter for updates on that. You can also support all my multimedia work, including my music, comics, recipes, and more at Patreon.com/BijhanValibeigi.

What book should be made into a game (card, PC, board, etc.) and why? Is there a specific character who you would want to play in this game?

The “Roma Sub Rosa” books by Steven Saylor would make a fantastic video game. Because it’s a murder mystery series, I would want it to be an original story so I couldn’t guess the ending. In the stories, there’s often a sense of running out of time, and there’s a lot of daring escapes, but very few out-and-out fights. Since so many video games are either currency-based, or about obvious violence, it would be really fun to have an action mystery game to change it up. Also, it would be a lot of fun to solve crimes while immersed in the sights and sounds of Ancient Rome.

If everyone came with warning labels, what would yours say?

I’d have a few…
“Cries at children’s television shows, but not funerals.”
“Needs chocolate daily, and hugs three times daily, or else unit ceases to function.”
And, finally, “Not a meaningful source of f**ks.”

What were you like as a kid? Did your kid-self see you being a writer?

Most definitely. At a very young age I came to understand all media as having been created by a person, and therefore I could be that person. I wrote children’s books as a very small child and made copies for my parents. I would create elaborate stories and draw the characters in great detail. As I grew older I wrote embarrassingly self-indulgent action stories with no literary merit, along with some pretty funny sketch comedy. So it feels like a very natural progression into being a writer of more elaborate and meaningful fiction. Although, directly to the point of the question, what was I like as a kid? I was very strange. I would embody the characters of my imagination in every way. My mother likes to tell the story of how, one day, when I was a very small child, I went to sleep while pretending to be a dog, and when I woke up, I woke up as a dog, down to the bark and the panting. The realm of my mind has always felt very real, and something I’m eager to share.

If you could sit down and have dinner with 5 dead authors, who would you invite to the table? What would they order?

A large part of me just wants to see some awesome drama. It would be an occasion for me to kick back and watch people yell at each other.

So, therefore, I would want the first three to be William F. Buckley, Jr., Gore Vidal, and Truman Capote. The final two, to fill out the rabble-rousers who would absolutely loathe one another, would have to be Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. These five people would absolutely hate one another, and I would love to watch them argue and feud. I imagine Buckley and Vidal would find some way for their orders to be barbs at one another, while Capote would probably order something self-indulgent. Hobbes would make a very conservative choice, based on the cost and health; Locke would likely have brought something from home.

Care to share an awkward fangirl/fanboy moment, either one where someone was gushing over your work…..or one where you were gushing over another author’s work?

I have a terrible memory for faces, and I’m not much better with names, so I often have fans who have met me before approach me as if we are old friends, but whom I cannot recall at all. I, personally, have not had an opportunity to geek out over an author in person. I did, however, have an extended e-mail correspondence with Keith DeCandido when I was in high school about the Star Trek novels he wrote. I have no idea why he provided such detailed responses to such a bratty child – which I most assuredly was at the time – but our conversations on the non-binary nature of Andorian gender roles actually played a part in my own awakening to my identity as a gender outside the binary. I had a chance to email him again, as an adult, to thank him for that correspondence. He admitted no memory of it, which is understandable, and was very kind and gracious – as always.

What is a recurring or the most memorable geeky argument or debate you have taken part in?

I have three arguments I get in most regularly, and perhaps most passionately, because my opinions are not popular. To be brief, and not to go into detail:

1) Star Trek: the Next Generation was a bad sequel to Star Trek.

2) Power Rangers is deeply underrated as a science fiction series.

3) Most contemporary mainstream video games are really boring and derivative.

BijhanValibeigiAuthorAbout Bijhan Valibeigi

Bijhan Valibeigi is a writer, game designer, musician, and trans Muslim from West Seattle. When Bijhan is not pwning newbs in every kind of game ever made, hating on TNG for being objectively worse than Star Trek, or cheering for the BC Lions, she spends time at home with her partner RaeRae, three lovely cats Reza, Kya, and Jasper, and old cranky dog Elsa.

Find Bijhan and her works online

Website

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ValibeigiBeginningOfABizarreFriendshipSynopsis of The Beginning of a Bizarre Friendship

In the 161st Century, the Vampires have conquered their own Homeworld of Earth, and driven Humanity into the furthest reaches of space. From our exile across the galaxy, our people use time travel technology to wage a war against Vampirekind. We must change the past to protect the future.
Yet there are heroes who do not use time travel technology – clandestine warriors who remain in the shadows to hunt the monsters who lurk there. This secret-cloaked sorority is usually quite skilled at protecting its mysteries.

But sometimes, secrets can become revealed…

 

GIVEAWAY!!!

Bijhan is graciously offering up 3 ebook copies of The Beginning to a Bizarre Friendship. This giveaway is open internationally. To enter, do the Rafflecopter thing below, or answer the following in the comments:  1) Which dead author(s) would you like to have dinner with?  2) Leave a way to contact you (email or twitter or facebook). Giveaway ends midnight June 10, 2016.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Comments are always appreciated, so don't be shy!

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