Interview: Scott McKenzie, Author of Drawing Dead

Posted on

MckenzieDrawingDeadEveryone, please welcome Scott McKenzie. I enjoyed his gambling vampire book, Drawing Dead, and you can check out that review over HERE. We chat about Scott’s day job, some of his favorite books, his earliest fanfiction (He-Man!), and much more. Enjoy!

How does modern pop culture influence your work? Do modern cultural references date a piece or add touchstones for the reader?

I’m heading towards 40 so I’m now in the period of my life where all new music is just a load of noise and all the good movies have already been made! Pop culture does influence my work though – I drop references to my favourite books and films into my stories, but my editor Rebecca Burruss is good at telling me when they take the reader out of the story. I guess it’s all about context. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline would be nothing without all the pop culture references, but if the same references were used in any other story, they would come across as having been shoe-horned in unnecessarily.

Given the opportunity, what fantastical beast of fiction would you like to encounter in the wild? Which would you avoid at all costs? Would you take a selfie with the beastie?

I’d have to say vampires – I’ve written a few vampire stories and I love the mythology.  I’d be sure to have a sharp stake at hand though! I’ve just finished reading book two of Blake Crouch’s Wayward Pines series, so I’m sure anyone who has read those books would want to avoid the monsters in there… As for a selfie, the answer is no. I don’t do selfies, with or without beasts.

McKenzieDeathByAutopenWhat has been your worst or most difficult job? How does it compare to writing?

I work in IT – I’m an Operations Manager for an online gaming site. It is a busy, high-pressure job where things can change at the drop of a hat. In essence, my day-to-day activities are at the opposite end of the spectrum from someone who can sit down in front of a blank screen and tap away at a keyboard for a few hours. I’ve been lucky in my professional career up to this point by the fact that I’ve mostly worked with decent people, but every now and then you run into people or systems that get in the way of you when you’re just trying to do your job. I try to channel my frustrations into my writing – bad processes and bad management are common themes in my stories. My short story “Death by Autopen” is all about someone who finds himself on the President’s kill list due to an administrative error.

What book should be made into a game (card, PC, board, etc.) and why? Is there a specific character who you would want to play in this game?

One of my favourite novels is The Dice Man by Luke Rhinehart. The central premise of the book – life is random so you may as well roll a pair of dice to decide your fate – would make for a great board game. However, some of the themes in the book may make it a board game for over-18s only!

McKenzieOneDayInGitmoNationIn this age of publishing, self-promotion is really necessary for the author. What do you enjoy most about advertising yourself and your works? What do you find most challenging?

I enjoy running giveaways on Goodreads and giving books away for free using Kindle Select. Every now and again I’ll set one of my books or short stories to be free in the Kindle store for a day or two. Sometimes I’ll promote the freebie and sometimes I just sit back and watch what happens. It’s a good experiment in working out the difference active promotion makes. I like meeting new people on Goodreads – it’s the best place to make friends with people who want to read the crazy stuff I’ve written. What I find most challenging is getting out of my comfort zone to promote my work. I’m an only child who likes to lock himself away in a room making stuff up!

What were you like as a kid? Did your kid-self see you being a writer?

I wrote stories as a kid, which were usually heavily based on what I was into at the time. I can remember writing Star Wars, He-Man and Transformers stories that were probably total nonsense, but the love of filling a blank page with a story has never left me. I also loved the read-along book and cassette stories that always came out with major film releases. Anyone who was into them should check out www.readalongadventures.com

McKenzieRebirthIf I wasn’t reading, chances are I was watching films. I went to the cinema a lot when I was a kid, and I was over the moon to get Alex Hyde-White to do the narration for my first audiobook – Drawing Dead: A Tale of Poker and Vampires. He was the star of Biggles: Adventures in Time, a film I remember watching in the cinema, which I still go back to now and again.

The Desert Island Collection: what books make it into your trunk and why?

I guess it’d be a good idea to put some long books on the list in case I’m on the desert island for a long time! Here are five books I’d happily be stuck alone on a beach with:

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas – Classic adventure.
It by Stephen King – My favourite book by my favourite author.
Killing Floor by Lee Child – Gotta have some Jack Reacher on hand.
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens – The perfect feel-good story.
Twelve Grand by Jonathan Rendall – Very funny and interesting book about a journalist who was given £12,000 to gamble with and told to write a book about it.

McKenzieKrampusWhat do you do when you are not writing?

With work and family life, I get very little time to write so the answer to this one is – everything else! I have two children who I spend as much time with as possible, but they inspire my creativity. Without them, I wouldn’t have written Krampus: A Christmas Tale (http://scottamckenzie.com/Krampus.html) or hooked up with Phil Ives, who did the incredible artwork for the book. Phil and I have just started working together on another scary picture book for children. This one’s called Frankentickler

Places to Stalk Scott

Website

Goodreads

Twitter

Publishing Blog

Comments are always appreciated, so don't be shy!

%d bloggers like this: